GREBE Report on Commercialization of Ready-To-Deploy Renewable Energy Technologies

GREBE 7.2 Cover page

A new GREBE report has now been published titled “Commercialization of ready-to-deploy renewable energy technologies – Professional project development as a strategy to access leverage and manage risk on the path-to-market”. The paper is an effort to contribute to GREBE’s mission to promote technology transfer and to provide contents for mentoring as one of GREBE’s key activities.

This report can be downloaded from the GREBE Project website here

The paper presents an overview about fundamental aspects of project development, project finance and risk management. which apply to technologies that reside on the higher levels of technology readiness. As to their financial risk, these technologies are likely to be rated as investment-grade financial commitments. In practice, for a technology to get access to the market, “readiness” must be assessed and confirmed within the scope of a commercial project development process.

The information collected applies to all kinds of businesses irrespective of size and legal form. This kind of information is valuable for new market entrants, who without prior experience are going to embark on renewable energy as a sponsor or host and are confronted with new responsibilities starting from the identification of a business opportunity and continuing through project conception, assessment and commissioning up to the commercial operation of the project.

In practice, technology assessment is embedded in a wider project development process  that accounts for the operational and organisational aspects as well as the external environment that have an effect on the financial conditions for technology deployment. A project development process provides a common understanding about how the project’s strategic goals will be met, its financial attractiveness and the risks involved. As to decision making, it should provide a commonly agreed pathway towards a project plan for submittance to a RFP procurement process or to finance approval.

Focusing on project development as a collaborative endeavour accounts for the fact, that renewable energy projects are embedded in a social context and that they involve multiple parties and multiple issues that have to be resolved collectively. Therefore, deliberate efforts that ensure good communication and consensus building among stakeholders contribute to successful project completion.

As to the aggregate level, the paper makes the point that the implementation of a professional project development and assessment process is one of the keys to unclose and mobilize the complementary resources that are critical for a technology to successfully proceed on its path-to-market.

The promotion of international technology transfer for pushing renewable energy technologies forward on the path-to-market provide the motivation for the key activities of the GREBE project. A new GREBE report has now been published called “Commercialization of ready-to-deploy renewable energy technologies – Professional project development as a strategy to access leverage and manage risk on the path-to-market”

Renewable energy projects have developed into an attractive business opportunity for the private sector including entrepreneurs, local companies, contractors, operators, suppliers or other stakeholders. The respective technologies have matured and provide attractive investment-grade opportunities for private investors.

Those who decide to embark on renewable energy as a sponsor or host often do have to start without professional experience as a project developer in this special field. They are confronted with new responsibilities starting from the identification of a business opportunity and continuing through project conception, assessment and commissioning up to the commercial operation of the project.

The fundamentals of project development as they are put down in this GREBE report apply to all kinds of businesses, irrespective of their size and legal form, from large corporations to sole proprietorships, and to all forms of renewable energy.

This GREBE report presents some complementary aspects of market deployment, which apply to any technology, but specifically also for renewable energy technologies. One of the main points is the fact, that the understanding and implementation of fundamental principles of project development and financial risk management is crucial for the diffusion of renewable technologies into commercial operation. Another motivation is the view that the implementation of a professional project development and assessment process has to be considered as one of the keys to unclose and mobilize the external resources and expertise that are critical for a technology to successfully proceed on the path-to-market. In practice, technology assessment is embedded in a wider project evaluation framework that accounts also for the operational and organisational aspects as well as the external environment that have an effect on the financial conditions for technology deployment.

Previously presented technology and knowledge transfer cases are supporting the activity towards this report supporting enterprises in introducing new to market energy solutions. This activity was part of the GREBE project´s “Knowledge & Technology Transfer and Business Delivery” working package led by Luke.

This report can be downloaded from the GREBE Project website here

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Minister Naughten called on to set target to supply 70% of electricity from renewables by 2030

Irbea post
Speakers: Dr John FitzGerald (Climate Change Advisory Council), Des O’Toole (IrBEA President), Marie Donnelly (Former Directorate General for Energy), Michael McCarthy (CEO of ISEA), Dr David Connolly (CEO of IWEA)

Eight organisations representing renewable energy in Ireland united today to call on Minister for Communications, Climate Action and Environment Denis Naughten TD to set a target to supply 70 per cent of electricity from renewables by 2030.

These 8 organisations are as follows:

  • Irish Wind Energy Association
  • Irish Solar Energy Association
  • Irish Bioenergy Association
  • Irish Wind Farmers Association
  • Host in Ireland
  • Irish Energy Storage Association
  • Marine Renewables Industry Association
  • Smart Grid Ireland

In June 2018 the European Union agreed that 32 per cent of the EU’s energy – across electricity, heat and transport – will come from renewables by 2030. Ireland’s share of that target will be negotiated with the EU in the coming months.

A comprehensive report from leading energy and utilities experts Baringa may be downloaded here. It says it is technically possible and cost neutral to the consumer for Ireland to use renewable energy to supply 70 per cent of our electricity by 2030, which would go a long way towards reaching the EU target. A summary of the report can be found here.

It follows confirmation from the Climate Change Advisory Council in July that Ireland will miss its overall 2020 target for renewable energy, warnings from the Environmental Protection Agency highlighting the failure to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and comes as the International Panel on Climate Change meets in Korea.

In September the Joint Oireachtas Committee on Climate Action began meeting to respond to the calls from the Citizens’ Assembly earlier this year for Ireland to become a leader in tackling climate change. Currently, approximately 30 per cent of Irish electricity comes from renewables and while Ireland will fall short of its overall 2020 target it is expected to still reach its 40 per cent electricity target.

In June 2018 the EU agreed to increase the share of renewables in energy to 32 per cent by 2030 and in December the Irish Government will publish its draft National Energy and Climate Plan (NECP). This plan will set out Ireland’s 2030 renewable energy target and likely will, like the 2020 target, be broken down across the electricity, heat and transport sectors. It is expected that Ireland will be one of two EU countries to miss our 2020 target of 16 per cent renewable energy although our target of 40 per cent renewable electricity is still achievable.

A copy of the Baringa study is available here.

A summary of the report can be found here.

Resource Assessment Toolkit for Wind Energy

Wind

The Toolkit outlines best practice techniques for assessing wind resource potentials as a foundation for a wind resource assessment. The wind resource assessment entails industry-accepted guidelines for planning and conducting a wind resource measurement program to support a wind energy feasibility initiative. These guidelines do not embody every single potential technique of conducting a quality wind measurement program, but they address the most essential elements based on field-proven experience.

The scope of the Toolkit covers:

  • Wind resource assessment 101
  • Sitting of monitoring systems
  • Measurement parameters and monitoring instruments
  • Installation of monitoring stations
  • Site operation and maintenance
  • Data collection and management
  • Data validation
  • Data processing
  • Comparison of observed wind data with historical norm
  • Wind flow modelling

The first wind turbines for electricity generation were developed at the beginning of the 20th century. Thus, wind technology is one of the most mature and proven technologies on the market. In 2015, the wind energy industry installed 12.8 GW in the EU – more than gas and coal combined. Globally, the current wind power installation capacity has reached 435GW with a significant growth rate of 16.4% in 2014 and 17.2% in 2015.

wind-turbine-1

Wind turbines offer the prospects of cost efficient generation of electricity and fast return on investment. The economic feasibility of wind turbines depends primarily on the wind speed. Usually, the greater the long term annual average wind speed, the more electricity will be generated and the faster the investment will pay back. However, it is important to access the wind power potential (WPP) at any prospective location to decide the capacity of wind resource for electricity generation within available time limits of wind duration. Hence, it is relevant to observe the wind characteristics and type of wind turbine technology suitable for any given promising location. These factors are very much helpful for wind power developers and investors to make a decision with respect to the economic constraints.

Details of the Resource Assessment Toolkit for Wind Energy may be downloaded here:

http://grebeproject.eu/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/GREBE-Resource-Assessment-Toolkit-for-Wind-Energy-July-2018-1.pdf

The Influence of Environmental Conditions in NPA and Arctic Regions

4.3 pic

The key requirement of this work package is the development of a database (and supporting summary report), compiling information for potential renewable energy business and technology solutions to help overcome environmental and climatic challenges in the NPA programme region. Technology solutions cover installation, operation and maintenance of equipment, not the design and manufacture of components.

The objective of the database is to identify the main environmental and climatic challenges, and outline technological and business solutions to these challenges, creating a database of these for 8 different categories of renewable energy technology. It is designed for use by new and existing renewable energy businesses, to inform them of the challenges they may face in developing their business and how these will be overcome.

A range of examples (where available) have been highlighted on how the challenges identified have been overcome. Specific regional related innovations and smart solutions from local business on technology driven RE-solutions have been documented, with the intention of passing on this knowledge to other regions in the NPA not involved in the GREBE Project.

The 8 renewable energy technology categories identified by the GREBE Project partnership are:

  1. Biomass
  2. Wind (Onshore only)
  3. Solar PV
  4. Solar Thermal
  5. Hydro
  6. Ground source heat pump
  7. Air source heat pump
  8. Anaerobic Digestion (farm scale/agricultural)

The database is located on the Renewable Business Platform and can be downloaded here.

Resource Assessment Toolkit for Solar Energy

SolarThe Toolkit outlines best practice techniques for assessing solar resource potentials as a foundation for a solar resource assessment. Solar resource assessment is indispensable in estimating the solar potential in a given location, the social and environmental impacts accompanying the resources exploitation and the economic viability of solar utilization scenarios.

The scope of the Toolkit covers:

  • Governing principles of solar energy
  • Measuring Solar Irradiation
  • Parameters for choice of optimal measurement station
  • Data acquisition and quality control
  • Solar radiation modelling – satellite-based models
  • Applying solar resource data to solar energy projects
  • Forecasting Solar Irradiation
  • Best practices in on-site monitoring programmes

Map

Solar energy is obtainable in abundance in most parts of the world, even in the NPA remit. As seen in the solar irradiation map above, the NPA Region’s average sum of solar irradiation is well below most parts of Europe. However, during the summer period, the countries based in the NPA region get around 17 to 19 hours of daylight and those in the Arctic Circle get 24 hours. Solar PV requires daylight (solar irradiation), rather than sunshine and high temperatures, which makes it a viable technology choice for businesses in the NPA region.

Details of the Resource Assessment Toolkit for Biomass Energy may be downloaded here:

http://grebeproject.eu/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/GREBE-Resource-Assessment-Toolkit-for-Solar-Energy-July-2018.pdf

Resource Assessment Toolkit for Biomass Energy

Biomass

The Toolkit outlines best practice techniques for assessing biomass resource potentials as a foundation for a biomass resource assessment. Biomass resource assessment is indispensable in estimating the bioenergy potential in a given location, the social and environmental impacts accompanying the resources production and the economic viability of biomass utilization scenarios.

The scope of the Toolkit covers:

  • Resource potential – theoretical, technical, economic or implementation potential
  • Approaches for estimation of resource potential – (resource focused, demand driven or integrated approach)
  • General principles, techniques and methods when undertaking a biomass resource assessment
  • Forest biomass and methods for resource assessment
  • Energy crops and methods for resource assessment
  • Agricultural residues and methods for resource assessment
  • Organic waste and methods for resource assessment
  • Global and country specific tools to make preliminary resource assessment and how to use them

Lumber stacks

The classification in types of biomass potentials is the first and most important step when undertaking a biomass resource assessment as it provides insight into explicit conditions, assumptions and limitation made in the assessment. The potential of the resource will define the feasibility of the project, return on investments, environmental considerations, coupled with social and political frameworks.

Details of the Resource Assessment Toolkit for Biomass Energy may be downloaded here:

http://grebeproject.eu/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/GREBE-Resource-Assessment-Toolkit-for-Biomass-Energy-July-2018-1.pdf

Support Scheme For Renewable Heat – Phase 1 open for Heat Pumps

 

Heat Pump

SEAI have announced that a new heat pump grant is now available to commercial, industrial, agricultural, public and other non-domestic heat users not covered by the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS). The Government grant covers 30% of eligible costs.

This is the first of two phases in the support scheme for renewable heat. The second phase will provide support for biomass and anaerobic digestion through tariff payments. State Aid approval has not yet been granted by the EU Commission for the second phase and it is expected that it will be open before the end of the year. Funding will then be available for the following technologies:

  • Biomass heating systems
  • Anaerobic digestion heating systems
  • Biomass boiler or biomass HE CHP heating systems
  • Biogas (anaerobic digestion) boiler or biogas HE CHP heating systems

To find out more and begin your application click here