The Influence of Environmental Conditions in NPA and Arctic Regions

4.3 pic

The key requirement of this work package is the development of a database (and supporting summary report), compiling information for potential renewable energy business and technology solutions to help overcome environmental and climatic challenges in the NPA programme region. Technology solutions cover installation, operation and maintenance of equipment, not the design and manufacture of components.

The objective of the database is to identify the main environmental and climatic challenges, and outline technological and business solutions to these challenges, creating a database of these for 8 different categories of renewable energy technology. It is designed for use by new and existing renewable energy businesses, to inform them of the challenges they may face in developing their business and how these will be overcome.

A range of examples (where available) have been highlighted on how the challenges identified have been overcome. Specific regional related innovations and smart solutions from local business on technology driven RE-solutions have been documented, with the intention of passing on this knowledge to other regions in the NPA not involved in the GREBE Project.

The 8 renewable energy technology categories identified by the GREBE Project partnership are:

  1. Biomass
  2. Wind (Onshore only)
  3. Solar PV
  4. Solar Thermal
  5. Hydro
  6. Ground source heat pump
  7. Air source heat pump
  8. Anaerobic Digestion (farm scale/agricultural)

The database is located on the Renewable Business Platform and can be downloaded here.

Advertisements

Advice Notes on Solar PV Technology Economics for the NPA Region

Solar PV

The Advice Notes aim to provide introductory material for entrepreneurs, startups and SME’s, considering to enter into the renewable energy sphere and based in the NPA regions partners to GREBE. The scope of the Advice Note covers regional, trade and industry, renewable energy (RE), technology information from Ireland, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Iceland and Finland. Different partner regions have different level of deployment of the various RE technologies covered by the Advice Notes. Thus, the level of information will vary depending on the level of deployment for each technology. For example, wind is not deployed on a large scale in North Karelia (Finland); however, it is widely deployed in Scotland, Ireland and Northern Ireland.

Full details are available on the GREBE website:

http://grebeproject.eu/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/GREBE-Advice-Notes-SOLAR-PV.pdf

The focus of the Advice Notes is on regional information of some of the main economic characteristics sited as imperative, when making an informed choice, regarding which RE technology may be the optimal choice for a new business venture:

  • Costs and economics associated with the relevant technology
  • Support schemes available, relevant to the technology
  • Government allowance/exemptions, relevant to the technology
  • Funding available for capital costs of the relevant technology
  • List of the relevant to the technology suppliers/developers, with focus on local/regional, suppliers/developers and the products and services they offer.

As seen in the in the solar irradiation map below, the NPA Region’s average sum of solar irradiation is well below most parts of Europe. However, during the summer period, the countries based in the NPA region get around 17 to 19 hours of daylight and those in the Arctic Circle get 24 hours. Solar PV requires daylight (solar irradiation), rather than sunshine and high temperatures, which makes it a viable technology choice for businesses in the NPA region.Map

Financial incentive schemes and massive global deployment and development of solar PV panels has facilitated to address the relatively high capital costs of photovoltaics, by reducing the typical payback period and making it more financially viable investment. Solar PV technology uses solar cells, which are grouped together in panels, to produce electricity when exposed to sunlight. Solar PV is a highly modular technology that can be incorporated into buildings (roofs and facades) and infrastructure objects such as noise barriers, railways, and roads.

This makes PV an apt technology choice for use in urban and industrial areas. At the same time solar PV is appropriate for rural areas as well. This is particularly because solar PV delivers an economical and clean solution for the electrification of remote rural areas where the power from the grid is not available or very expensive. In most cases Solar PV systems may need to be accompanied by energy storage equipment or auxiliary power units, to supply electricity when the sun is not available.

Solar cells and modules come in many different forms that vary greatly in performance and degree of development. Solar PV is characterised by its versatility. Panels can be effectively employed at a very wide range of scales and in different locations and applications range from consumer products (mW) to small-scale systems for rural use (tens or hundreds of watts), to building integrated systems (kW) and large-scale power plants (mW/gW).2

The technology costs have dropped tremendously due to economies of scale in production and technological advances in manufacturing. A price decrease of 50% had been achieved in Europe from 2006 to 2011 and there is a potential to lower the generation cost by 50% by 2020. Furthermore, solar PV takes less time to plan and install, compared to other RE technologies.

Advice Notes on Geothermal Economics for the NPA Region

Geothermal

The Advice Notes aim to provide introductory material for entrepreneurs, startups and SME’s, considering to enter into the renewable energy sphere and based in the NPA regions partners to GREBE. The scope of the Advice Note covers regional, trade and industry, renewable energy (RE), technology information from Ireland, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Iceland and Finland. Different partner regions have different level of deployment of the various RE technologies covered by the Advice Notes. Thus, the level of information will vary depending on the level of deployment for each technology. For example, wind is not deployed on a large scale in North Karelia (Finland); however, it is widely deployed in Scotland, Ireland and Northern Ireland.

Full details are available on the GREBE website:

http://grebeproject.eu/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/GREBE-Advice-Notes-Geothermal.pdf

The focus of the Advice Notes is on regional information of some of the main economic characteristics sited as imperative, when making an informed choice, regarding which RE technology may be the optimal choice for a new business venture:

  • Costs and economics associated with the relevant technology
  • Support schemes available, relevant to the technology
  • Government allowance/exemptions, relevant to the technology
  • Funding available for capital costs of the relevant technology
  • List of the relevant to the technology suppliers/developers, with focus on local/regional, suppliers/developers and the products and services they offer.

913946_10151355412055978_1481536158_o

It is understood that the ultimate source of geothermal energy is radioactive decay occurring deep within the earth. In most regions, this heat reaches the surface in a very diffuse state. Nevertheless, due to a range of geological processes, some areas, including substantial portions of the NPA region, are underlain by comparatively shallow geothermal resources.

However, Iceland is taking geothermal power and technology to an advanced level by exploiting the resource for power generation. Other countries in the NPA region are exploring options of exploiting the geothermal resources by the use of deep geothermal technology but are still far behind in comparison to Iceland.

Renewables project aims to continue EES in North Karelia

BlogThe Finnish Forest Centre and Karelia UAS have applied for a project, Renewables – Sustainable Energy Economy in North Karelia – from the Rural Development Programme. The project continues on from the successful work of regional Power from Biomass project, completed in June 2018, and the GREBE project ending this month.

The Renewables project will support the establishment of micro clusters in renewable energy, especially based on biomass (wood and biogas). The project will continue the GREBE service, Entrepreneur Enabler Scheme, by organising tailored mentoring for 8 rural businesses in 2019-2021.

The Renewables will work for the regional renewable energy by supporting the development of biogas production, establishing and supporting the cooperation between energy entrepreneurs especially in firewood supply, introducing new innovations to reduce fine particle emissions, and supporting rural enterprises in sustainable product and service development.  The Renewables will have much benefit from GREBE project results, providing vast knowledge base on renewable energy technologies and supports.

The Renewables supports micro clusters of RE enterprises. Their cooperation aims can be e.g. in establishing joint raw material procurements, joint investment projects, or development of new products/services. In GREBE the EES Service and mentoring process provided successful results in a number of cases. The piloted process has proven to be effective and can be replicated with new participants. The funding applied, can be based on Innovation vouchers (2019) and ERDF funding targeted for enterprises.

The Renewables is scheduled to start in January 2019, and is coordinated by the Finnish Forest Centre. The project will organise active collaboration with international renewable energy research and development, such as starting NPA project Handiheat.

Technology/Knowledge Transfer Cases

Chipper

One aim of the GREBE project is to promote knowledge sharing and information exchange between actors in renewable energy supply and demand. Transnational sharing of knowledge is a key element of GREBE and special focus of working package 7 in order to facilitate transnational effective knowledge transfer and collaboration in the RE business sector. Two more case reports are now available on the transfer of technology and knowledge in the NPA:

Ecohog – Technology for the waste and recycling sector

Ecohog Ltd. is a family owned equipment manufacturer located in Co Tyrone, Northern Ireland. Although a small and medium-sized enterprise (SME), Ecohog is operating in a global scale and have over 20 years’ experience supplying equipment to the waste and recycling sector.

Worldwide, there is a greater focus on minimising waste, reducing landfill waste and recycling in general. Therefore the need to integrate efficient waste separation and processing technology is a growing global concern. Also in Finland, the recovery of waste has become increasingly important. The technology transferred to Finland provides an alternative to manual sorting which is both exhausting and expensive. The technology allows customers to incorporate air separation into new or existing processing configurations that experience contaminates in the materials.

This is available on the GREBE Renewable Business Portal: www.renewablebusiness.eu and can be downloaded here: Ecohog – Technology for the waste and recycling sector

Innovative Hybrid Chipper for Forest Chip Production – a theoretical technology transfer case study

This report is about the innovative hybrid chipper for forest chip production and is a pure theoretical technology transfer case based on a simulation study using input data from the literature.

Several parameters to improve knowledge towards the transferring of the technology and applying it in other partner regions were the focus of this study on an innovative hybrid technology chipper. The focus was on the knowledge on fuel supply costs and supply system requirements for this technology in order to supports market access of new technology and to reduce the risks relating to long-term performance and costs for such technology through the used method. The method used was discrete-event simulation with the simulation of one year performance.

This is available on the GREBE Renewable Business Portal: www.renewablebusiness.eu and can be downloaded here: Innovative Hybrid Chipper for Forest Chip Production

All technology and knowledge transfer cases are supporting the activity towards a guideline supporting enterprises in introducing new to market energy solutions.

Supporting the transnational transfer of knowledge and technology, the Renewable Business Portal provides a platform to demonstrate the full potential of the renewable energy (RE) sector and showcase innovations in RE technology.

Government approves scheme to diversify green energy

DNaughten

A new scheme designed to diversify the State’s renewable energy production and boost its chances of meeting key EU targets has been approved by the Government. The Renewable Electricity Support Scheme (RESS) is designed to help the State meet its renewable pledges up to 2030. Its first priority is to boost renewable energy production quickly to help turn 16 per cent of the State’s energy needs “green” by 2020. The scheme will incentivise the introduction of sufficient renewable electricity generation by promoting investment by community groups in green projects. Offshore wind and tidal projects will be central if the State is to meet its targets, while it is expected to also support an immediate scale-up of solar projects. Projects looking for support under the scheme will need to meet pre-qualification criteria, including offering the community an opportunity to invest in and take ownership of a portion of renewable projects in their local area.

Auction system

The RESS scheme introduces a new auction system where types of energy will bid for State support. It is proposed that the scheme be funded through the Public Service Obligation Levy, which is a charge on consumers to support the generation of electricity from renewable sources. Individual projects will not be capped, but the Government will limit the amount that a single technology, such as wind or tidal, can win in a single auction. The auctions will be held at frequent intervals throughout the lifetime of the scheme to allow the State to take advantage of falling technology costs. The first auction in 2019 will prioritise “shovel-ready projects”. “By not auctioning all the required capacity at once, we will not be locking in higher costs for consumers for the entirety of the scheme,” Minister for the Environment Denis Naughten said. In effect it should make it easier for solar and offshore wind to get investment, yielding multiple billions for green projects over the next 15 years.

2020 vision

It is hoped renewable energy will represent 40 per cent of the State’s gross electricity consumption by 2020, and 55 per cent by 2030, subject to determining the cost-effective level that will be set out in the draft National Energy and Climate Plan, which must be approved by the EU and in place by the end of 2019. In addition the scheme is intended to deliver broader energy policy objectives, including enhancing security of supply. “This scheme will mark a shift from guaranteed fixed prices for renewable generators to a more market-oriented mechanism [auctions] where the cost of support will be determined by competitive bidding between renewable generators,” said Mr Naughten. The next step for the Government is to secure EU approval for the package, which typically takes six to nine months. It is estimated that the first auction will be in the second half of next year.

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/environment/government-approves-scheme-to-diversify-green-energy-1.3575492

Action Renewables document highlights areas for improvement in north’s renewable landscape

AR

A leading company that provides renewable energy advice has released its latest policy document which outlines areas for improvement for the north’s renewable landscape. ‘Proposal for a renewable future’ produced by Action Renewables, focuses on issues such as energy efficiency, green gas, renewable transport, security of supply, renewable heat and job security. Each focus comes with recommendation’s which are aimed at encouraging debate within the sector and driving forward the development of new policies and goals.

The document emphasizes the growing threat to the renewables industry in the north highlighting the potential loss of more than 3,000 jobs in the sector due to a ‘lack of clear policy and withdrawal of incentives’. According to the report one-third of total energy consumption in the north occurs through the transport sector with 94 per cent of this associated with petrol and diesel in road vehicles. The document also draws upon the possibility of imported fossil fuel prices rising post-Brexit and suggests generating renewable energy from local sources.

Action Renewables announced the launch of its most recent policy document at the European Energy Policy Forum which had over 100 delegates in attendance. Topics covered at the event included renewable energy opportunities for SME’s, hydropower energy recovery technology, and reductions in greenhouse gas emissions.

Michael Doran, managing director at Action Renewables said: “The large turnout for our first European Energy Policy Forum highlights the appetite in Northern Ireland to continue to develop and implement renewable energy technologies to help reach our renewable energy and greenhouse gas reduction targets. Developed in 2010 with a ten-year implementation plan and 2020 targets for heat and electricity, the Strategic Energy Framework’s deadlines are looming, and with the current policy vacuum in place within our government, Action Renewables has produced our most recent policy document to encourage conversation and continued growth within the sector to meet these targets and improve the long-term forecast for renewable energy in Northern Ireland.

“We look forward to stimulating debate and ultimately driving our renewables sector forward locally following distribution of this document and with the on-going work of our collaborative networking organisation, AREA, which provides expert renewable energy advice to members.”