Power from Biomass project final seminar, Monday 11th June, Joensuu

KUAS

The Rural development programme co-financed Power from Biomass project completed its work in June 2018 after three years of renewable energy development in North Karelia, Finland. The project cooperating closely with GREBE in North Karelia, resulted in several new investments including two solar PV and energy storage systems in community buildings of Höljäkkä and Haikola in Nurmes. Project also established a regional network of 15 renewable energy demonstration sites.

The final seminar held in Joensuu, presented projects main outputs, latest developments in renewable electricity production, biomass-based small-scale combined heat and power, solar energy project of heat enterprises, and intelligent solar PV systems.

Project manager Antti Niemi from Pielinen Karelia Development Company PIKES Ltd. summarized the project results. The project established a regional demonstration network with 15 sites demonstrating renewable energy production systems. The Energiaraitti website presents the technical and economic information and live-information of solar PV systems. New production units established were mostly solar PV and some energy storages systems in farms, other rural enterprises and community buildings. The biomass-based renewable energy had a challenging business environment due to low price of fossil fuel oil. Despite, also some new biomass-based energy systems were established.

Project manager Kim Blomqvist from Karelia UAS presented the solar PV systems integrated into biomass-based district heating plants. Investments were made for 7 district heating plants with total annual production of 52 MWh. The heating plans were considered suitable for the solar PV as they have balanced electricity demand.

Marketing and product development manager Kimmo Tolvanen, representing regional energy company PKS, presented an in-depth overview of the energy system development in Finland and North Karelia. The main game changers in the energy system are expected to consist of wind and solar power production, energy storages and digitalization working all effectively together. The energy grid changes toward decentralised, intelligent and adaptive systems are evident. In addition, electricity markets are in transition, and new service developments are expected throughout the system from production to consumption.

Project coordinator Anssi Kokkonen from Karelia UAS presented the technical solutions of biomass-based combined heat and power production. The solutions included woodchip gasification plant (Volter Ltd.), Nano-chp Stirling engine (9 kWth + 0.6 kWe), fuelled by wood pellets (Ökofen).  Both solutions are demonstrated at Sirkkala Energy Park by Karelia UAS.

Project manager Toni Hannula from energy company ESE (Etelä-Savon Energia, Mikkeli) presented intelligent solar power systems. The smart energy transition project by Lappeenranta Technological University has generated an overview of the systems change. The ESE has been successful in establishing biogas fuel stations, and piloting intelligent solar PV systems with 48 hours production forecast and directing the production optimally depending on energy price (electricity spot-price optimizing) and production and consumption loads. The system is piloted in Lumme Energia Oy estates.

The Power from Biomass project developed as a diverse renewable energy project and delivered several new services and RE production sites were established. The project had an international element through cooperation and networks of the GREBE project.

Advertisements

GREBE publishes its seventh project e-zine

Xmas Page2

The GREBE Project has published its seventh e-zine to showcase the activities and ongoing goals of the project.  

Since October we have continued to carry out the project activities and meet our objectives. Our 7th partner meeting in Enniskillen was hosted by Fermanagh & Omagh District Council and included a networking event and site visits. The aim was to highlight the benefits of renewable energy for SMEs and start-up businesses, and give participants the opportunity to meet with biomass experts from the Natural Resources Institute in Finland. Details can be found on page 3. A policy workshop was held by the Western Development Commission as part of their Regional Heat Study for the Western Region. Details can be found on page 4.

GREBE’s Funding Options tool has been launched and provides information on the funding mechanisms currently available in the partner regions. More details on this can be found on page 6 and is available at http://support.renewablebusiness.eu/

Another highlight for the GREBE project was the launch of the Renewable Business Portal. The Portal is an online training and networking portal which allows for flexible and easy access to training material and technology transfer information. Details can be found on page 7 and 8 and can be visited at http://renewablebusiness.eu/

Our Entrepreneur Enabler Scheme in Northern Ireland is complete and has now been launched in Finland, Scotland and Ireland. Details can be found on page 9. Our e-zine can be downloaded from the GREBE Project website here. This has been a great year as far as achieving our targets are concerned, and we have many more activities lined up for 2018.  We wish you a joyful and peaceful Christmas, and a prosperous New Year.

Hybrid solutions case information from Finland now available!

Farm

A Case video has been published by GREBE partner LUKE on Itikka farm Iisalmi, Finland. The Itikka farm is located in a rural forest and agriculture dominated region very near to the city of Iisalmi in the region of Northern Savo, Finland. Currently energy production plays an important role in the farm´s business. The energy production on the farm includes an own biodiesel production unit, a wind turbine, solar panels and a ground source heat pump.

The Itikka farm is in a private family ownership since the year 1905. The farm has a high annual energy consumption of approximately 150 000 kWh especially high needs for seed processing and drying. The Itikka farm currently employs three external employees with one being employed in the field of energy.

The system is driven by the objective of being self-sufficient by meeting the energy demand of the farm with local resource and moving away from fossil energy. Currently a self-sufficiency of about 50-70% is achieved. Own energy consumption (electricity, heat and fuels) of about 150 MWh, drives own production. The farm has available by-products that can be utilised in bio-oil and briquette production.

The Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke) has now published a GREBE video on the Itikka farm hybrid solutions case. The video is available in two language versions, English and Finnish.

Please have a look at the hybrid solution of this farm and check the English version of the case video here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mWQ3NpsFsc0

The Finnish language version is available under:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_BfWx9T-ujA

The GREBE case study report on the Itikka farm can be found under:

http://grebeproject.eu/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Hybrid-Energy-Solutions-Itikan-Tila-Iisalmi-Finland.pdf

More information on the renewable business topic in general can be found from GREBE’s Renewable Business Portal under: http://www.renewablebusiness.eu

Norwegian Energy Partners

NSP 06-11-2017

The establishment of the new organisation – Norwegian Energy Partners – is the result of a merger between INTSOK and INTPOW in 2017 given the name NORWEP. NORWEP will continue to provide support to the oil and gas supply industries in Norway, but will also now work with the renewable energy sector. The Norwegian Energy Partners will be combining the competence in previous INTSOK and INTPOW to mutual benefit for the whole Norwegian energy industry – as the international oil companies now reshaping and extending their investment strategies and the Norwegian supply industry looking to be well positioned to compete also in the renewable markets. In 2018 the Norwegian Government would give 3.7million Euro to NORWEP – to promote the Norwegian energy sector to the international market.  

INTSOK/INTPOW

INTSOK was an effective vehicle for promoting the Norwegian offshore industry’s capabilities to key clients in overseas markets and providing market information to its partners. The focus was on global opportunities, not only amongst large Norwegian companies but also amongst small and medium-sized enterprises. INTSOK was a network-based organisation where the partners exchange experience and knowledge of market developments internationally. INTPOW was the only national and the principal networking organisation for the Norwegian renewable energy industry. INTPOW’s members were Norwegian authorities, companies and other industry participants with an international expansion strategy. The joint forces between INTSOK and INTPOW will be an even stronger unit to open doors for Norwegian companies and technology.

The new organisation – NORWEP  

Norwegian Energy Partners will be combining the competencies of both organisations to mutual benefit for the whole Norwegian energy industry – building on:

  • The Norwegian energy sector has developed industry with experience, ideas, products and technologies – that are competitive in the most demanding global markets.
  • International oil companies are now reshaping and extending their investment strategies in to the renewable energy sector.
  • The Norwegian industry, known for its safe, reliable and energy efficient solutions, could also have a competitive edge with the increasing awareness around climate change.

The Norwegian Energy Partners role will be to continue the effective work done by INTSOK/INTPOW – for promoting the Norwegian energy industry’s capabilities, technologies and competence to key clients in the overseas markets and providing market information to the partners. NORWEP would still be a network-based organisation, facilitating dialogue between energy companies, technology suppliers, service companies and the Government.

New possibilities – Investment in renewable energy

Investment in renewable energy, energy efficiency and low carbon solutions are rapidly increasing. The Norwegian supply industry has a lot to offer in this changing energy landscape. The petroleum industry has solved technological challenges in a demanding environment on the Norwegian continental shelf since the very beginning of the oil production in Norway. The Norwegian supply industry has over 100 years of experience in developing hydropower, and is increasingly delivering technology to solar and wind development projects. The supply industry’s valuable competence is utilised across sectors. In fact, half of the members of former INTSOK – traditionally delivering to the petroleum sector, also delivers equipment, services and technology to the renewable energy sector.

  • Solar energy
  • Hydropower
  • Wind energy

 

Arctic and cold climate solutions

The Norwegian Energy Partners would also have a special focus on arctic and cold climate solutions – to strengthen Norwegian arctic related technology and competence. NORWEP wants to pave the way for Norwegian industry delivering world class technology and solutions for arctic and cold climate areas, as well as infrastructure – looking at international markets as USA (Alaska), Canada and Russia.

This is of course a very interesting focus for the Northern Periphery and Arctic Programme, NORWEP and the Norwegian Government discussing arctic and cold climate development projects.

Fast track internationalisation

NORWEP will assist the participating companies from the energy sector – in identifying their most optimal international markets based on the products and services the individual companies offer, as well as connect the companies to their respective markets. The result is an internationalisation strategy with defined activities and action plan on how to achieve the objectives. All done to reach a higher level of internalisation of the Norwegian energy business – building on fast track solutions.  

Canada needs EU for the development of bioeconomy

ceta

According to the Conference Board of Canada, Northern peripheral areas in Canada have about 300 distant communities, where sustainable development for energy, waste management and clean water could be developed much further than where they currently are. Natural Resources Institute Finland sent Dr. Lauri Sikanen to Ontario to Lakehead University for four months to investigate renewable energy opportunities in distant communities.

Dr. Sikanen sees a great potential to support Canada in their development and to open also markets for European advanced technology of bioenergy and cleantech. Dr. Sikanen hosted the visit of Finnish Minister of Foreign Trade and Development Mr. Kai Mykkänen and a delegation of about 20 leading Finnish bioeconomy companies in Thunder Bay 10.-12. of October and now further steps of most promising leads are in his schedule.

Distance communities are producing their energy by transported diesel and that takes energy price in communities sky high. It is normal to pay five or even ten times higher price for energy in those communities than elsewhere.  Large numbers of communities are located in forested areas and have remarkable amount of solar and wind available as well. Using biomass, solar and wind would also bring more economic activity into communities.

EU and Canada just recently made a CETA agreement to harmonize regulations in trade between them. Now export of good and services should be easier for both, but bioeconomy development in Northern areas in Canada needs an extra attention. NPA programme already welcomes some areas of Canadian Maritimes into projects but the need for the development supported together is actually also (and even more) elsewhere. It would be good to have northern areas of provinces like Quebec and Ontario included and joint programme with Canadians could be created.

Another “extraordinary month” for renewable energy in Scotland

ERI June 2017
Source: Scottish Renewables (2017) https://www.scottishrenewables.com/sectors/renewables-in-numbers/?utm_source=Twitter&utm_medium=Social%20Post

The month of May showed that renewables can still play their part in providing large amounts of electricity even in summer months. Wind turbines alone provided enough electricity to supply 95% of Scottish homes thanks to windy weather. The 863,495MWh of electricity provided to the grid was an incredible increase of 20% compared to May 2016.

Solar energy was also increasingly able to supply 100% of electricity needs to houses fitted with panels across a number of areas in Scotland. Aberdeen, Dumfries, Dundee, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Inverness and Lewick houses fitted with photovoltaic panels benefited from 100% of their average use generated from the sun. Solar hot water panels also provided 90% of household’s average hot water needs in the same Scottish areas.

Across the United Kingdom there was also records broken on the 26th May with the National Grid reported a peak of 8.5GWh over a half hour period at midday. This was almost a quarter of total UK demand.

Scotland continues to increase its renewable energy capacity with an average annual increase of over 660MW since the end of 2008. Total installed renewables capacity sat at 8642GW at the end of 2016 of which the breakdown can be found below. This ever-increasing renewables capacity allows Scotland to reach renewable energy targets and climate change targets whilst still exporting low carbon electricity to its neighbours.