Green Marine Technology in Iceland

Greenmarine

Iceland has about 60 technology companies that create technology that are suitable for sea-related operations. Many of them are leaders in their field, both in terms of quality and environmental protection. The companies are focused in durable goods, efficiency, good use of energy, oil savings, water savings and hygiene.

The 10 Icelandic companies have been collaborating closely together recently through the Iceland Ocean Cluster and their newest cooperative project is a website, greenmarinetechnology.is where users can explore a virtual world of eco-friendly tech solutions. Introducing everything from geothermal energy utilization to ecofriendly trawl doors, Green Marine marks a turning point in jointly marketing technology solutions for the seafood industry.

Green technology refers to technology, which improves production processes, productivity and efficiency, use of raw materials or energy and reduces waste and pollution. Technological development is a key environmental issue. The call for environmentally friendly technologies is in all areas. Renewable energy and energy efficiency are prominent, as it is clear that if the goal of reduced greenhouse gas emissions is to be achieved it´s necessary to make changes in energy matters.

Many Icelandic high tech companies are leading in its field in terms of quality and eco-friendliness. They generally emphasize quality, efficiency, power savings, water savings and sanitation. These two key elements, quality and Eco friendliness, are extremely important when marketing Icelandic technology

Further infomation:  http://www.greenmarinetechnology.is/

Advertisements

NPA Annual Conference 2017 – Galway, Ireland

Marine Institute

The GREBE Project will attend the NPA Annual Conference 2017 which takes place in Galway on 21st September.  The theme of this years conference is ‘Blue Growth’.

The programme for the conference not only focuses on the Arctic, but also aims to contribute to the Atlantic Strategy. The conference will address such topics as entrepreneurship and innovation related to fisheries and aquaculture, environmental protection and maritime and coastal tourism.

Galway located on the Atlantic coast is a fitting location. The venue is the Marine Institute, which plays a national coordinating role in the Atlantic Strategy.

The Western Development Commission, Action Renewables, Fermanagh & Omagh District Council and the Environmental Research Institute will attend and meet with other projects funded under the NPA programme.

Information on the NPA Programme and conference is available here

Northern Ireland Rural Development Programme (NIRDP) 2014-2020

F&O LAG

The NIRDP 2014-2020 has six priorities and is supported by a total budget of approximately £623 million.  The six priorities are:

  1. Knowledge transfer and innovation in agriculture, forestry and rural areas
  2. Farm competitiveness and risk management
  3. Food chain organisation
  4. Restoring and enhancing ecosystems
  5. Promoting resource efficiency
  6. Social inclusion, poverty reduction and economic development in rural areas

Fermanagh and Omagh Local Action Group (LAG) Ltd which covers the Fermanagh and Omagh district, is one of ten LAGs responsible for delivering Priority 6 in the rural areas of Northern Ireland.  The overall aim of Priority 6, which has a budget allocation of approximately £70 million, is to promote social inclusion, poverty reduction and economic development in rural areas (LEADER).  The NIRDP 2014-2020 is part financed by the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development (EAFRD) and the Department of Agriculture Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA).

The Fermanagh and Omagh LAG will, through programme delivery with a budget of approximately £8.29 million and by working in partnership with other agencies, contribute to the development of stronger rural communities through the creation of a more diverse and outward looking prosperous rural economy. The LAG will do this by creating greater local employment opportunities. The LAG will also support innovative approaches to the development of local services and facilities meeting the needs of the changing rural population.  The LAG will achieve this by delivering the following Schemes:

  • Rural Business Investment Scheme
  • Rural Basic Services Scheme
  • Rural Village Renewal Scheme
  • Rural Broadband Scheme
  • Co-operation Scheme

Details of the Rural Business Investment scheme are available on this factsheet: Rural Business Investment Scheme Factsheet

The Fermanagh and Omagh LAG Board comprises 24 Members of which 11 are elected representatives nominated by Fermanagh and Omagh District Council (FODC) and 13 social partners representing the business, community and agriculture sectors.

Fermanagh and Omagh District Council acts as the Administrative Council with responsibility for all financial and administrative matters.

Roadmap to Market – a report on market access of renewable energy technologies

Market Access Paths

The GREBE project studied the market access paths of RE and energy storage technologies by using a case-study approach. The case studies (n 12) included technology descriptions, technology demonstration and deployment issues and support systems. The case-based paths provided information on important drivers and barriers, thus providing background for the business mentoring support of the GREBE project. The summary report of key findings, roadmap to market, as available now in GREBE Project Publications.

Basing on the case study findings, coordinated technology planning is an essential part of the roadmap to market, i.e. strategy to proceed from the technology development and demonstration to its successful market deployment. Technology planning covers both planning of the new technology development, but can be also applied as a process of updating and adopting new existing technologies for the business enterprises.

The development paths of technologies included several steps building on the earlier ones, and time-span was up to 15-20 years. Without coordination and planning procedures, the market-access can be very difficult to reach, and innovations can be lost. As a part of the technology planning, technology transfers can be utilised. They can include technologies (or sub-technologies) of different readiness levels, and new to area solutions. The role of technology transferring agents, i.e. persons (often multi-nationals) with experience of different industries and operational environments remains essential.

Bridging the gap between demonstration and deployment remains also as a key challenge. The gap between the technology demonstration and deployment can be reduced by establishing and utilising soft supports, industry clustering and partnerships in demonstration, for instance. Public sector has often an essential role in providing the supporting infrastructures (such as business and technology parks) and funding instruments.

Partnerships are essential for risk sharing in long and often capital intensive processes, as well as finding suitable sites for demonstrator projects.  There were several types of partnership models applied in RE technology cases. They were often place-based and utilising local trust and previous experiences.

End-user support is essential part of the early deployment. Technologies typically have still improvement needs and often end-users need training and support for the deployment. This raises the importance of the development of the end-user supports along the technology development, and full availability of the service and maintenance as the technology reaches the market.

6.2 roadmap
The process of technology planning, including business objectives (strategy) driving the technology needs. Technology evaluations inform the business objectives and technology planning activities to achieve the established vision. Technology plan serves as a roadmap for meeting the established long-term objectives.

What is going on in the Arctic?

The Arctic is still a cold place, but it is warming faster than any other region on Earth. Over the past 50 years, the Arctic’s temperature has risen by more than twice the global average. In 2016, the annual mean temperature in Svalbard was 6 degrees higher than normal – so we are already witnessing actual consequences of global warming to Arctic life. These rapid changes have consequences well beyond the Arctic.

NSP 08-09-2017

What Arctic change does to the world

Once Arctic warming gets going, it has two important dynamics with unpredictable effects.

  • As the Arctic warms and sea-ice and snow-cover retracts, this weakens surface reflectivity. The bare ground and open water absorb more heat from the sun and amplify warming further. This feedback is an important reason why the Arctic warms at twice the rate of the global average.
  • The Arctic permafrost is a storehouse for trapped greenhouse-gases such as methane and CO2. When the permafrost is thawing, these greenhouse-gases could be released to the atmosphere, amplifying global warming further. These secondary effects are adding unpredictability. Unpredictability in terms of consequences – but also unpredictability in terms of the pace of climate change. As we know, unpredictability means enhanced risks.

Arctic warming is accelerating

A new scientific assessment of climate change in the Arctic, by the Arctic Council’s Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP), concludes that the Arctic is now shifting — rapidly and in unexpected ways — into a new state.

If we allow current trends to continue, they will have profound and accelerated impacts on ecosystems, human health and safety, industries and economies around the world. Certainly, this will also influence our security environment. Recent research indicates that this could increase risk levels not only in the Arctic, but in regions very far from the Arctic areas. This is due to the climate system – It is highly interconnected on the global scale. The Arctic region acts as a global cooling system by drawing warm ocean water from the south and cooling it down. This movement of warmer ocean waters to the north has a major influence on climate outside the Arctic; it accounts for northern Europe’s relatively mild climate, and it keeps the Tropics cooler than they would otherwise be.

The rapid melting of Arctic ice and snow is likely to weaken this global cooling system, amplifying global warming, and intensifying its consequences throughout the world.

Artic warming will amplify security risks

So while global warming is a multiplier of existing security risks and threats, the Arctic is an amplifier of global warming. Indirectly, a warmer Arctic will indeed also amplify security risks worldwide. We are seeing, and will see ever more extreme weather events. We are seeing more stress on critical ecosystems, including oceans, freshwater, and biodiversity. These changes, in turn, will have direct and indirect social, economic, political, and security effects.

Extreme weather can trigger crop failures, wildfires, energy blackouts, infrastructure breakdown, supply-chain breakdowns, migration, and infectious disease outbreaks. We can expect climate change to exacerbate current conditions: making hot, dry places hotter and drier, for example. Over the longer term, global climate change will change how and where people live, where they can produce food, as well as the diseases they face.

Science is increasingly concerned that more sudden, dramatic shifts could be possible. Such shifts in the climate or climate-linked ecosystems could have dramatic economic and ecological consequences.

Accelerated climate change

Accelerated climate change, therefore, is not only a significant risk factor in its own right – it is a factor that can interplay with and magnify other risk factors: economic, technological and demographic.

  • Economic risk – The globalised economy, the risks to free trade and the global economy are real.

The physical risks that arise from the increased frequency and severity of climate- and weather-related events that damage property and disrupt trade. The liability risks – the risks posed to companies business models by climate change. The transition risks which could result from the adjustment towards a lower-carbon economy. Changes in policy, technology and physical risks could prompt a reassessment of the value of a large range of assets. Just as we can have climate shocks and technological disruptions, we may also have “policy shocks” in response to dramatic climate events.

  • Technology induced risks – Combatting climate change will require faster technological change.

Technology is accelerating the pace of change around us, and in the process it is triggering new complex challenges, disruptions and tensions.

  • Demographic risks – Risks associated with demographic shifts.

Urbanization is a welcome trend in terms of more climate friendly living with regard to housing, transport systems and other public infrastructure. At the same time, with more extreme weather events, rising sea levels and pressure on critical infrastructure, urban centres are increasingly vulnerable.

Climate action is of high strategic importance

Climate change is a security challenge, and hence climate policy is of high strategic importance. The work in the GREBE project workpackage 4 is a small contribution to the strategic work on climate policy and security challenges – with a practical focus on business strategy models.

Climate policy matters!

Moving Ireland’s offshore renewable energy sector forward

Lir 01-09-2017
Dr Jimmy Murphy, general manager of Lir, with Irish Climate Action Minister Denis Naughten and Georgina Foley, commercial manager, Lir

A new ocean test facility in Cork offers companies a chance to de-risk and test technologies before they enter the commercial market.

Ministers have called the Lir National Ocean Test facility, which is incorporated in the MaREI Centre and located in the €20.5m purpose-built Beaufort Building, is key to the development of Ireland’s offshore renewable energy industry.

“The diversity of our work at Lir reflects the numerous commercial opportunities that offshore renewable energy presents.  We support companies by de-risking their technologies through our extensive testing capability including towing, installation, performance and survivability testing,” said Dr Jimmy Murphy, general manager, Lir National Ocean Test Facility.

He pointed out that the facility also operates in the broader marine sector as it has the capacity to test any structure that can be fabricated at a smaller scale.

In the past, Lir has tested Oil & Gas platforms, aquaculture cages, vessels, breakwaters and coastal protection structures.

The facilities at Lir, which are available to industry, academia and government agencies nationally and internationally, include four wave tanks that can replicate real ocean conditions and allow testing of various marine technologies and structures at different scales.

Dr Murphy said that in relation to testing of offshore wind, wave and tidal energy technologies, Lir is the only facility with the capacity to link tank testing output to electrical test rigs, that emulate power take off systems, to determine power quality from devices and possible grid integration issues.

By Anne-Marie Causer http://www.maritimejournal.com/news101/industry-news/moving-irelands-offshore-renewable-energy-sector-forward