Growth Open (Kasvu Open) provides growth support for 450 SMEs in 2017

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The name of the competition combines two words “Kasvu”, which means growth in Finnish, and “open”, summarizing the idea of the competition being open for every type of a company and for any expert willing to share own knowledge on a pro bono basis.

Kasvu Open is the largest project for sparring growth-oriented companies in Finland. In this competition, companies have an opportunity to present their growth plan to number of experts free of charge. As a result, companies will have a clarified growth plan, enlarged network of growth venture experts and potential investors in the country.

In 2017 over 900 experienced managers will meet 450 small and medium size companies for a total amount of time exceeding 4550 hours. Following the main goal of Kasvu Open, hundreds of experts offer their knowledge and skills on a voluntary basis. Kasvu Open gathers growth professionals, investors and other partners into one solid network, which supports the attending companies.

Although first defined as a competition, Kasvu Open does not aim at competition for the titles. It builds a platform where entrepreneurs introduce ideas, test them, receive feedback, polish their plans and try to solve problems together with the experts. Anyone can participate in Kasvu Open, regardless of the scale of growth or goals.

Karelia UAS key partner in North Karelia, Bio10 Ltd. attended at 2016 Growth Open achieving Fast Track Bio Citation Award. Bio10 was established in 2007 to treat organic waste and produce biogas based energy and both organic and conventional fertilisers. In addition, the company provides expertise and training services in biogas, waste treatment and recycling.

Christmas Greetings from the GREBE Project

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From all of us at GREBE Project, we wish all our followers a very Happy Christmas & all the very best wishes for 2017.

2017 will be a busy year for GREBE, and in February will we have our next partner meeting in Joensuu, Finland where we will launch our online knowledge sharing platform. We are joining with IEA Bioenergy Task 43 to hold a joint seminar on Thursday 9th February ‘From resource to sustainable business’.  Further details on this will be available in January on our website http://www.grebeproject.eu/ and social media.

Growth strategy guidelines for SMEs and micro-enterprises and a report identifying technologies which can be transferred from areas of best practice to areas where renewable energy uptake is low will also be published in February.  Later in 2017, we will roll out of Entrepreneur Enabler Scheme in Ireland, Scotland, Finland, Norway and Iceland.

Please continue to follow our project and share with your colleagues and friends !

Could Norway become a hydrogen nation?

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Local businesses in Narvik says yes – we both can and shall become a green hydrogen nation. “Let’s use the surplus and trapped renewable energy to produce hydrogen – and distribute the hydrogen and make it accessible to growing zero emission markets in Norway and the rest of the world”. This is the conclusion from the Hydrogen meeting in Narvik arranged by Narvik Science Park.

The Renewable Energy Directive 

The EU Renewable Energy Directive establishes an overall policy for the production and promotion of energy from renewable sources in the EU. It requires the EU to fulfill at least 20% of its total energy needs with renewables by 2020 – to be achieved through the attainment of individual national targets. All EU countries must also ensure that at least 10% of their transport fuels come from renewable sources by 2020.  In November 2016, the Commission published a proposal for a revised Renewable Energy Directive to make the EU a global leader in renewable energy and ensure that the target of at least 27% renewables in the final energy consumption in the EU by 2030 is met.

National action plans

The Directive specifies national renewable energy targets for each country, taking into account its starting point and overall potential for renewables. These targets range from a low 10% to a high of 50%. EU countries set out how they plan to meet these targets and the general course of their renewable energy policy in national renewable energy action plans – and the progress towards national targets is measured every two years when the EU countries publish national renewable energy progress reports.

The Directive promotes cooperation amongst EU countries and with countries outside EU (Norway) to help EU meet their renewable energy targets.

Norway – Hydrogen nation?

Norway would have a close cooperation with EU and will adapt to the Renewable Energy Directive by making national plans for Norway – especially for Hydrogen, where Norway would start to make a strategy for Hydrogen production and establishing Hydrogen Fuel stations  across the country from January 2017.

Norway is in a unique position as it has a surplus of renewable energy production, annually 20 Terrawatt hours, and limited grid capacity for export – which means trapped renewable energy production that could be used for Hydrogen production. There also exists a political will to support energy intensive industries such as hydrogen production. This means that hydrogen could play a significant role in the future – both as export of hydrogen and as fuel for national land transport (Network of Hydrogen fuel stations).

Hydrogen meeting in Narvik

The Narvik Hydrogen meeting was arranged by Narvik Science Park in cooperation with the Hydrogen production company; Glomfjord Hydrogen and the Hydrogen technology company; NEL Hydrogen – just to look into the interest for establishing Hydrogen fuel stations across Norway – and the local businesses interest for investing in Hydrogen fuel stations. 20 local companies say yes to hydrogen technology solutions and that Norway should become a hydrogen nation.

From Spring 2017 there would be a close cooperation between Narvik Science Park and ENOVA – to look closer into how local companies can contribute to investments in hydrogen technology solutions and establishing Hydrogen fuel stations in the Narvik region – as a bit of a national plan to become a hydrogen nation.

GREBE E-Zine No. 3 is launched

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The GREBE Project has launched its third e-zine to showcase the activities and ongoing goals of the project.

Over the past couple of months, we have continued to carry out the project activities and meet our objectives. This e-zine will highlight details of our Summary Report on the relevant policy initiatives in the partner regions and showcase of eleven examples of best practice policy initiatives, our Business Supports Catalogue for Renewable Businesses and details of four participating companies in our Entrepreneur Enabler Scheme. To read our e-zine, please click here

We would like to wish all our readers a happy Christmas and the very best wishes for 2017.

Scottish firms exporting renewables expertise worldwide

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Research by Glasgow based industry body Scottish Renewables has found firms from across Scotland are working in countries as diverse as China, Russia, Taiwan and Cape Verde and are now active on every continent bar Antarctica.

Across the Northern Periphery and Arctic area Scottish companies have been active in the Faroe Islands, Finland, Norway, Sweden as well as other northern countries including Canada and Russia. Firms have been involved in projects totalling £125.3 million across 43 countries.

Businesses have included Orkney based consultancy Aquatera which has been involved in creating marine energy projects across the United States, Chile, Japan, Columbia, Peru and Indonesia.  An Ayrshire based crane company, Windhoist, has installed more than 4,800 wind turbines across the globe whilst Glasgow’s Star Renewable Energy has installed a heat pump in Drammen, Norway, which now provides warmth for the city’s 63,000 residents.   Jenny Hogan of Scottish Renewables has said “This research clearly shows that Scotland’s expertise in renewable energy is in demand around the world.”

“The stretching targets set in Scotland have meant our home-grown green energy industry has developed skills which are in demand on every inhabited continent, bringing investment and income to Scotland from across the world.”

The Scottish Government has welcomed the figures as evidence of low carbon industries to the Scottish economy.  Business, innovation and energy minister Paul Wheelhouse added: “Low-carbon industries and their supply chains generated almost £11 billion in 2014 and supported 43,500 jobs, according to figures from the Office for National Statistics published recently. “Together with this new research from Scottish Renewables, the figures reinforce the growing importance of the low-carbon industries, including renewable energy businesses, to the Scottish economy and vindicates the Scottish Government’s support for the sector and the increasingly crucial role it plays within our energy mix and the wider economy.”

CGN Europe Energy buys 14 windfarms in Northern Ireland and Ireland from Gaelectric

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Gaelectric Holdings has confirmed the sale of wind farms totalling 230MW in Ireland and Northern Ireland to CGN Europe Energy, the renewable energy arm of China General Nuclear Power Group. The deal comprises 10 operating projects with a total capacity of 184MW, and a further four wind farms totalling 46MW that will be operational by mid-2017.

Seven of the wind farms are in Northern Ireland and seven in the Republic of Ireland, Gaelectric said. The company added that it will continue to provide asset management and power offtake services to CGN Europe Energy following the sale.

Gaelectric Holdings chief executive Barry Gavin said: “This agreement allows us to support the group’s balance sheet, paying down debt and creating the foundations for our other operational and development interests in the renewable energy sector.”

Winter climate change might have a negative effect on forest growth and productivity

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“According to an experiment conducted in Luke, denser snowpack or lack of snow cover due to warmer winters could have a major impact on forest ecosystems. Winter climate change might have a negative effect on forest growth and productivity that could partially counteract the positive growth effects predicted due to increasing summer time temperatures.

Winter warming is expected to affect snow cover in boreal forests by increasing ground ice encasement, snow compaction or even events of complete lack of snow cover. Of these predicted changes ice encasement appeared to be the most harmful winter conditions to Scots pine and Norway spruce seedlings. These effects could influence forest regeneration with important implications for boreal forest ecology and the associated economy such as forest regeneration costs. (…)” (Luke News)

The Original news article can be found from the news section of GREBE partner Luke under:

https://www.luke.fi/en/news/winter-climate-change-might-have-a-negative-effect-on-forest-growth-and-productivity/

From the GREBE perspective, the GREBE project is looking at the Influence of Environmental Conditions in NPA & Arctic Regions, a recent report can be found from the project´s website:

http://grebeproject.eu/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/GREBE-Report-on-the-Influence-of-Environmental-Conditions-in-NPA-Arctic-Regions.pdf