The Each Leim Microgrid for Energy Storage – Case Study

This project was a demonstration project under the GREAT Project (Growing Renewable Energy Applications and Technologies) which is an EU funded project under the INTERREG IVB NWE Programme. GREAT aimed to encourage communities and small to medium size enterprises (SMEs) to develop technological solutions for Smart Grid, Renewable Energy and Distributive Generation; to research and develop policy issues for regulatory authorities and to provide structured co-operation opportunities between SMEs and research institutes / technology developers.

Údarás Na Gaeltachta was lead partner on the GREAT Project, with two full-time staff allocated to the co-ordination and implementation of their project aims. Each Leim Enterprise Centre was selected as a demonstration site. The Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland (SEAI) also provided funding for this demonstration project under the Better Energy Communities (BEC) programme, and Údarás Na Gaeltachta utilized the expertise available in the SEAI in the development of the smart grid.

http://grebeproject.eu/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Battery-Storage-Each-Leim-Microgrid-Ireland.pdf

 

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Ireland plans to ban sale of new cars with tailpipes by 2030

Tailpipe

The Irish Government has pledged to ban the sale of new cars with tailpipes by the year 2030, as part of its commitment to environment issues. Minister for Communications, Climate Action and Environment Denis Naughten said that he told his European counterparts at a European Council meeting this week that Ireland “had set itself an objective” to ban the sale of all new cars with a tailpipe by 2030.

But he said that in order to do that, the European automotive industry needed to ramp up its efforts to reduce emissions and produce zero emissions cars. “They really need to drive ambition in this area so that we can reduce overall carbon emissions within the transport sector that make up one quarter of all carbon emissions within the EU.” There are widespread plans to ensure there are zero-emission vehicles on roads. Alternative fuel options are being looked at to introduce green-energy fleets for Dublin Bus, Bus Éireann and school buses. Ireland could be forced to pay up to €75 million each year if it doesn’t meet its EU renewable-energy targets by 2020 – with many experts and politicians saying it won’t meet those targets.

Cigarette butts

Naughten also discussed how to tackle cigarette butt litter with his European counterparts. Every single cigarette butt has 12,000 micro strands of plastic in it. As a result on a global level, we have 1,900 million strands of plastic going into our water streams every single second. And it’s not just a problem of microplastics getting into our waters, also the cigarette filters themselves are there to block tar and other chemicals going into the smoker’s lungs. “But they end up in our water courses, in our rivers having an impact on aquatic life, and in our fish stocks.” The 2017 National Litter Pollution Report showed that half of all street litter is made up of cigarette butts. It’s understood that on-the-spot litter fines are going to be increased from €150 to €250 in an attempt to tackle the problem.

http://www.thejournal.ie/tailpipe-cars-ban-ireland-4095250-Jun2018/?utm_source=shortlink

Scandinavian hydrogen cooperation

NSP 06-10-2017
Hydrogen Truck – Nikola

The Nordic countries have been joining forces in the Scandinavian Hydrogen Highway Partnership, SHHP, since 2006 with the purpose of deploying hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and constructing and clustering hydrogen refueling stations. Thanks to this, the region has distinguished itself as one of the earliest areas in the world where the latest hydrogen technology is demonstrated.

Why hydrogen?

One of the advantages of hydrogen is that it can store energy from all sources, including renewable energy sources. Hydrogen as an energy carrier is a very flexible alternative. Therefore hydrogen will play a key role in the necessary transition from fossil fuels to a sustainable energy system.

And at the moment it seems like the transportation sector can use renewable energy produced hydrogen to replace fossil fuel – as the market experience roll outs of both refueling networks and transportation vehicles.

Electrolysis – where electricity splits water to hydrogen and oxygen, is a useful method for producing hydrogen from renewable energy sources like wind, solar and hydro power. In this way hydrogen can play a role to balance the grid.

As with other fuels and energy carriers, hydrogen must be handled with special requirements. Since hydrogen has been used in the industries for over a century, we have very good knowledge of how to deal with it in order to minimize the risk of incidents.

Modern batteries have less energy loss than fuel cells and will play an important role in future transport. But the disadvantages with batteries are that they demand long charging times and are quite heavy. The combination of fuel cells and batteries in vehicles has proven very beneficial. Supplemented with fuel cells, electric cars will dramatically increase range and the refuelling takes only a few minutes, but in the transportation sector you also would need a lot of power to move heavy cargos – that means a lot of battries in each vehicles, not a problem for long distance trucks.

Network of refueling stations

The Scandinavian hydrogen cooperation consists of regional clusters involving major and small industries, research institutions, and local, regional and national authorities – Showing a multitude of pathways for hydrogen supply using local resources. The national networking bodies – Norsk Hydrogenforum in Norway, Hydrogen Sweden in Sweden and Hydrogen Link in Denmark – act as coordinators.

The Scandinavian hydrogen cooperation has as it’s goal to create one of the first regions in Europe where hydrogen is available and used in a network of refuelling stations.

All activities are based on effective collaboration across the borders and are backed with strong public and private support in terms of funding, attractive financial tax exemption schemes and investments. The main goal is to create one of the first regions in Europe where hydrogen is available and used in a network of refuelling stations. The first step is to connect the largest city in Scandinavia in a network of refueling stations:

  • Oslo
  • Stockholm
  • Copenhagen

The challenge would be to move this network of refueling stations further north. The plan is to move the hydrogen corridor further north – step by step.

Hydrogen – a solution for the transportation sector

The EU-parliament passed the directive Clean Power for Transport in September 2014, which will secure the roll out of alternative fuels such as methane, hydrogen and electric charging infrastructure with common standards throughout the EU. Plans on a national level for fossil free energy systems are in place both in Sweden, Norway and Denmark – and all of the Scandinavian countries have ambitious goals for replacement of fossil fuels in the transportation sector.

The dependence of fossil fuels in the transport sector is the single largest source of greenhouse gas emissions in Scandinavia. To be able to lower carbon dioxide emission, the overall energy consumption needs to decrease and the use of renewable energy increase.

The Hydrogen value chain

The Scandinavian hydrogen cooperation will strive to build up knowledge of strategies for business models for development and operation of hydrogen infrastructure for vehicles, as well as for establishing production and distribution of hydrogen. In this situation it would be necessary to look closer into the hydrogen value chain: solutions within production, storage, distribution and use of hydrogen that meets the renewable society challenges.

The Scandinavian hydrogen cooperation wants to strengthen the use of hydrogen in the transportation sector – so that hydrogen could be a replacement for fossil fuels in the transportation sector in the future – also in the northern parts of Norway.