Resource Assessment Toolkit for Wind Energy

Wind

The Toolkit outlines best practice techniques for assessing wind resource potentials as a foundation for a wind resource assessment. The wind resource assessment entails industry-accepted guidelines for planning and conducting a wind resource measurement program to support a wind energy feasibility initiative. These guidelines do not embody every single potential technique of conducting a quality wind measurement program, but they address the most essential elements based on field-proven experience.

The scope of the Toolkit covers:

  • Wind resource assessment 101
  • Sitting of monitoring systems
  • Measurement parameters and monitoring instruments
  • Installation of monitoring stations
  • Site operation and maintenance
  • Data collection and management
  • Data validation
  • Data processing
  • Comparison of observed wind data with historical norm
  • Wind flow modelling

The first wind turbines for electricity generation were developed at the beginning of the 20th century. Thus, wind technology is one of the most mature and proven technologies on the market. In 2015, the wind energy industry installed 12.8 GW in the EU – more than gas and coal combined. Globally, the current wind power installation capacity has reached 435GW with a significant growth rate of 16.4% in 2014 and 17.2% in 2015.

wind-turbine-1

Wind turbines offer the prospects of cost efficient generation of electricity and fast return on investment. The economic feasibility of wind turbines depends primarily on the wind speed. Usually, the greater the long term annual average wind speed, the more electricity will be generated and the faster the investment will pay back. However, it is important to access the wind power potential (WPP) at any prospective location to decide the capacity of wind resource for electricity generation within available time limits of wind duration. Hence, it is relevant to observe the wind characteristics and type of wind turbine technology suitable for any given promising location. These factors are very much helpful for wind power developers and investors to make a decision with respect to the economic constraints.

Details of the Resource Assessment Toolkit for Wind Energy may be downloaded here:

http://grebeproject.eu/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/GREBE-Resource-Assessment-Toolkit-for-Wind-Energy-July-2018-1.pdf

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GREBE publishes its 9th Project E-zine

GREBE Ezine Sept 2018

The GREBE Project has published its 9th e-zine to showcase the activities and ongoing goals of the project.  

Welcome to the 9th e-zine for the GREBE Project. Since April we have continued to carry out the project activities and meet our objectives. Our 9th partner meeting in Thurso was hosted by the Environmental Research Institute (ERI) and included a site visit to the world famous Old Pultney distillery and Wick District Heating Scheme. It also included our final conference ‘Local opportunities through Nordic cooperation’ on Thursday 24th May 2018. Details may be found on page 2.

Page 3 Header

The Renewable Energy Resource Assessment (RERA) Toolkits for Biomass, Wind & Solar Energy are now complete and details may be found on pages 3 & 4. The WDC completed a Regional Heat Study for the Western Region of Ireland and held two workshops on how the WDC can support and develop biomass use in the Western region. Details can be found on page 5. We also have an update of the EES in partner regions on pages 6 & 7 and details of the Action Renewables ‘Proposal for a Renewable Future’ on page 8. We have details on the development of a database based on the Influence of Environmental Conditions in NPA and Arctic Regions on page 9. And finally, we have details of Technology/Knowledge Transfer Cases on page 10.

Our e-zine can be downloaded from the GREBE Project website here.

 

IceWind – designers and manufacturers of small vertical axis wind turbines

IceWind designs and manufactures small vertical axis wind turbines for telecom towers and residential applications such as homes, cabins and farms.

The IceWind vertical axis wind technology has been designed in response to the growing demand for renewable technologies. It demonstrates that turbines can be an elegant, quiet, durable, cost effective and nearly maintenance free solution for energy production.

The company was founded in 2012 but development goes back to 2008, when Anemometer was designed as a final project in University of Iceland, where it all started.

For more details see:

http://grebeproject.eu/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Small-scale-Wind-Energy-IceWind-Iceland.pdf

 

Advice Notes on Wind Technology Economics for the NPA Region

Wind

The Advice Notes aim to provide introductory material for entrepreneurs, startups and SME’s, considering to enter into the renewable energy sphere and based in the NPA regions partners to GREBE. The scope of the Advice Note covers regional, trade and industry, renewable energy (RE), technology information from Ireland, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Iceland and Finland. Different partner regions have different level of deployment of the various RE technologies covered by the Advice Notes. Thus, the level of information will vary depending on the level of deployment for each technology. For example, wind is not deployed on a large scale in North Karelia (Finland); however, it is widely deployed in Scotland, Ireland and Northern Ireland.

Full details are available on the GREBE website:

http://grebeproject.eu/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/GREBE-Advice-Notes-WIND.pdf

The focus of the Advice Notes is on regional information of some of the main economic characteristics sited as imperative, when making an informed choice, regarding which RE technology may be the optimal choice for a new business venture:

  • Costs and economics associated with the relevant technology
  • Support schemes available, relevant to the technology
  • Government allowance/exemptions, relevant to the technology
  • Funding available for capital costs of the relevant technology
  • List of the relevant to the technology suppliers/developers, with focus on local/regional, suppliers/developers and the products and services they offer.

The first wind turbines for electricity generation were developed at the beginning of the 20th century. Thus, wind technology is one of the most mature and proven technologies on the market. In 2015, the wind energy industry installed 12.8 GW in the EU – more than gas and coal combined. Onshore wind is presently one of the most economically viable RE generation technologies. In areas with good wind resources, generating electricity with wind turbines is already competitive.  Thus, wind turbines offer the prospects of cost efficient generation of electricity and fast return on investment. The economic feasibility of wind turbines depends primarily on the wind speed. Usually, the greater the long term annual average wind speed, the more electricity will be generated and the faster the investment will pay back. The map below gives an overall picture of the wind potential across the globe, showing that the NPA region has a great potential to harness the benefits associated with wind energy generation.

Map

 

 

Increased generation from Scottish renewables

Windfarm near Ardrossan, Scotland

In June the UK Government released figures showing that renewable energy generation has seen a dramatic 11% increase in the first half of 2018 compared to the same period in 2017. Improved weather conditions for generation have seen wind generation in Scotland increase by 37%.

Paul Wheelhouse, Scottish energy minister, said: “These figures show that Scotland’s renewable energy sector is stronger than ever with almost exactly 1GW of new capacity installed since Q1 2017 and a strong pipeline of further projects still to be constructed.” Last year proved to be another record breaking year with provisional annual statistics showing that renewable electricity generation was up 27% on 2016 and 19% on 2015. The increase in generation now brings 69% of Scotland’s electricity consumption being delivered by renewable energy.

Scotland has long delivered on world leading electricity targets and is helped by an abundant onshore wind resource and historic hydro system. As the Scottish Government builds out new offshore wind and tidal projects the increase in generation only looks to continue. Recent plans for a new pumped storage hydro scheme on Scotland’s famous Loch Ness show a long term vision for the country’s electricity grid as it looks to increase penetration of renewables into its grid system. Climate change targets have been helped by the closure of Scotland’s last remaining coal powered fire station in recent years but ageing nuclear power stations and a “no new nuclear” policy look to add new challenges in the future.

Dingwall Wind Co-op operates a 250kW turbine on the property of Knockbain Farm near Dingwall

The Dingwall Wind Co-op was developed by David and Richard Lockett (the owners of the land) in partnership with Sharenergy, a co-operative helping to set up RE cooperatives. The turbine operates on the property of the Knockbain Farm near Dingwall. The Locketts’ acquired planning permission and grid connection, after they approached Sharenergy, which assured they can help them with the share offer to the rest of the community. The co-op structure, mitigated some of the risks associated with developing a wind project. Furthermore, Richard specified that he was fond of the idea of shared ownership.

The Wind Co-op owns and runs a 250kW wind turbine (WTN 250) just above Dingwall in Ross-shire. The turbine is the first 100% co-operatively owned wind development in Scotland. The Co-op was launched in September 2013 and the turbine was commissioned in June 2014. The Co-op has 179 members, 90% of whom are from the local area. The shares are between £250 and £20 000, with an average about £4000.

The co-op contributes to a community fund estimated at between £2000 and £8000/year. Members of the Co-op receive a return on their investment and EIS (Enterprise Investment Scheme for Investors) tax relief. The landowners, who originated the project, receive a rental payment for use of their land.

http://grebeproject.eu/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Wind-Energy-Dingwall-Wind-Co-op-Scotland.pdf