NORWEGIAN RENEWABLE INVESTMENT IN UK – GRAND OPENING OF DUDGEON WIND FARM

Dudgeon Turbines

The Dudgeon Wind farm is now completed and fully commissioned – right on schedule. The project is the largest Norwegian renewable investment in the UK and the Dudgeon Wind farm will harness wind to power 410,000 UK homes. Statoil and Statkraft had a grand opening of Dudgeon Wind farm in Norwich/Great Yarmouth on the 22nd of November.

The opening of the offshore wind farm took place as an official ceremony in Great Yarmouth’s Town Hall – and this happens 3.5 years after the investment decision was made, and only a year and a half after marine installations started. After the successful installation of the first 6MW wind turbine in early January 2017, all 67 Dudgeon Offshore Wind Farm wind turbines are now delivering electricity to the UK grid, providing clean, renewable energy to around 410,000 British homes.

Dudgeon also makes an important contribution to the UK’s renewable energy strategy and represents continued progress in the deployment of commercially viable clean technology. The support of the British government has been critical to the success of Dudgeon.

The Dundgeon Wind Farm project has required significant technical innovation from Statoil and Statkraft, and the technology transfer has been delivered through an excellent relationship with local companies and local suppliers.

East Anglia

The development of Dudgeon Wind farm has stimulated local jobs and economic growth for the East Anglia region – and the Dudgeon investment happens in the same area as an earlier Statoil renewable energy investment – The Sheringham Shoal. Together, these projects means a lot for the local economy in East Anglia.

In addition to Dudgeon, Statoil is operator for the Sheringham Shoal offshore wind farm in the UK- East Anglia, which has supplied electricity to around 200,000 homes since 2012.

The Statoil strategy is to develop from an oil and gas company to a broad energy major, Statoil will grow significantly in renewable energy, with an ambition to invest millions of Euro over the next few years. Dudgeon and East Anglia is a key part of this strategy to complement the oil and gas portfolio with profitable renewable energy solutions, as well as building upon Statoil’s already strong UK presence.

Dudgeon location

Maritime expertise

Offshore wind has been a natural place to start, as Statoil can build on their maritime expertise, experience from complex oil and gas projects and make use of their existing supplier chain. With Dudgeon in full production Statoil is well on its way to providing more than one million households in Europe with renewable electricity.

Maritime expertise in combination with improved technology and economic factors as; increased deployment and lower costs – are the key drivers turning offshore wind into an attractive power source, outcompeting traditional sources of energy in important markets.

Dudgeon Wind farm – in numbers

The Dudgeon Offshore Wind Farm is located approximately 20 miles off the North Norfolk coastline and has a maximum installed capacity of 402MW providing sufficient power to meet the annual demands of 410,000 UK homes.  The field comprises 67 turbines which are connected by 12 inter array cables to the main offshore facility which sits centrally in the field.

The offshore substation Jacket will be approx. 30m x 30m at the sea bed.  It spans a height of 48m from the cable deck to the bottom of the suction buckets.  Each bucket is 9m in diameter and 9m in height.  The Jacket will weigh approx. 1,300 tonnes once installed.

Dudgeon in numbers

Statoil Renewable Energy Portifolio in UK

Towards 2030 it is estimated that the installed capacity of offshore wind in Europe can grow from 12GW (2016) to 70 GW. Statoil wants to be a part of this development.

Statoil already has a sizeable renewables portfolio in UK – its current offshore wind portfolio has the capacity to provide more than 1 million homes with renewable energy. This includes the Sheringham Shoal wind farm and Dudgeon Wind Farm in the UK/East Anglia, and the Hywind Project in Scotland, the world’s first floating offshore wind farm, which came into production in October.

Statoil will grow significantly in renewable energy, with an ambition to invest around £9.5 billion over the next five years.

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The GREBE Project meets with renewable energy companies in Norway

IMG_5955

As part of the GREBE Project meeting in June, the Norwegian partner, Narvik Science Park, organised visits to hydropower installations and wind parks, as well as meetings with companies operating in the renewable energy sector in Norway.

The first meeting was held with Dag Smedbold of Statkraft (https://www.statkraft.com/).  Statkraft is a leading company in hydropower internationally and Europe’s largest generator of renewable energy. The Group produces hydropower, wind power, gas-fired power and district heating and is a global player in energy market operations. Statkraft has 3800 employees in more than 20 countries.   Dag outlined their development and the leading role they play in renewable energy in Norway and in Europe, particulary in the hydro sector.

Following our meeting with Statkraft, we met with Matthew Homola of Nordkraft (http://www.nordkraft.no/).  Nordkraft is an energy group focusing on the development, development, production and distribution of all natural renewable energy. The group also has interests in power sales and other energy-related businesses.  The renewable energy production comes from magazine power plants, small hydro and wind power. The distribution network covers Narvik Municipality, as well as wall in Evenes Municipality.

The group’s history dates back to 1913, when the first power plant was put into operation in Håkvik valley in Narvik municipality. It has mainly been public or publicly-owned owners all the time, except for some years in the 2000s when Danish E2 / Dong Energy were owners. As a result of this came the wind power initiative.

Matthew brought us Nygårdsfjellet wind farm, which was acquired by Fortum  along with two other wind power projects in late 2016.  Nordkraft continue to manage and operate this project. This wind farm consists of 14 turbines with a total capacity of 32,2MW.  Windmills have an installed capacity of 2,3MW each. The entry of Nygårdsfjellet wind farm was done in two stages. The first 3 turbines were put into operation in 2006 and the last 11 in 2011. Average annual production is 105GWh, corresponding to normal consumption of about 5200 Norwegian households.

Our last visit was to Nordkrafts first power plant in Håkvik valley.  Fred Johansen of Narvik Science Park outlined the history of the development of this hydropower plant and the development of renewable energy in northern Norway.