Technology and knowledge transfer cases

Knowledge Sharing - Page 4

Transnational sharing of knowledge is a key element of the GREBE project and special focus of working package 7 in order to facilitate transnational effective knowledge transfer and collaboration in the RE business sector and to promote knowledge sharing and information exchange between actors in renewable energy supply and demand.

Two case reports are currently available on the transfer of technology and knowledge in the NPA:

Nordkraft – Northern energy expertise

Nordkraft is an energy group focusing on development, production and distribution of renewable energy. In addition, the group has power sales and other energy-related businesses. The business focuses on planning, construction and operating hydro and wind energy plants.

The energy business model of Nordkraft includes business operations in energy infrastructure planning, development, construction, operation, maintenance and trade. The focus on establishing and operating the systems, and avoiding or sharing the capital investment risks, provides growth opportunities. The long-term emphasis on local expertise and business diversity provides permanent jobs in the sector supports the local socio-economic development.

http://grebeproject.eu/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/GREBE-Technology-Transfer-Nordkraft-Northern-Energy-Expertise-February-2018.pdf

Knowledge sharing expert sessions with SME´s

The GREBE project arranged a possibility for the transfer of knowledge within the Northern Periphery area by hosting expert sessions with SME´s, associations and land owner representatives in the sector of renewable energy supply and demand. The sessions were part of the GREBE project meeting events hosted by the Fermanagh and Omagh District Council from 6th – 10th November 2017. Two experts, Saija Rasi and Veikko Möttönen from the GREBE partner organization Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke) were available to the participants for one-to-one meetings on Wednesday 8th November.

Knowledge on two main topics were shared between the experts from Finland and SME’s:

  1. Biogas production and utilization possibilities in rural areas
  2. Further processing of sawn wood and side streams

The experts were also available during a networking event for businesses from Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland giving the opportunity to engage with one another or opening up the possibility of joint working opportunities in the future.

http://grebeproject.eu/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/GREBE-Knowledge-sharing-expert-sessions-with-SMEs-March-2018.pdf

Further technology transfer cases are currently under development supporting the activity towards a guideline supporting enterprises in introducing new to market energy solutions.

Support the transnational transfer of knowledge and technology, the Renewable Business Portal provides a platform to demonstrate the full potential of the renewable energy (RE) sector and showcase innovations in RE technology.

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Ireland’s electricity should be 70 per cent renewables by 2030, says wind farm group

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The Government should set an ambitious target for Ireland of producing 70 per cent renewable electricity by 2030, which would help transform the energy sector and benefit consumers, according to the Irish Wind Energy Association (IWEA). The call by the IWEA, which represents the wind industry – including the majority of windfarm operators in Ireland – is based on the findings of a study it commissioned which shows such a target was technically possible and, if achieved, would be cost neutral for consumers.

The Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment should set this 70 per cent challenge for the renewable energy industry, said newly-appointed IWEA chief executive Dr David Connolly. Ireland had the required expertise built up over the past two decades “across academia, system operators, regulators, and the entire renewable industry to meet the target”, he told the IWEA spring conference in Dublin. Following a study by Baringa, UK consultants in energy and utilities, IWEA has published its “Energy Vision” for 2030. It highlights the risk of “a return to reliance on fossil fuels towards 2030 after the 40 per cent renewables target [for electricity] set for 2020 is met”.

World leader

The study concludes Ireland can continue to be a world leader in renewable electricity, particularly wind, but:

  • Wind power, “the least costly technology”, will need to more than double between 2020 and 2030.
  • 2,500 megawatts (MW) of solar power capacity will be needed by 2030.
  • Construction of storage capacity in the form of 1,700 MW of new batteries by 2030 will be required.
  • Power plants need to become more flexible to adjust to fluctuations in wind and solar power, though an additional 1,450 MW will be delivered from interconnectors with Britain and France.

The group’s modelling confirms the possibility of not only providing clean power for the electricity sector, but renewable energy for heat and transport. It says “426,000 electric cars could be used instead of petrol/diesel, while 279,000 heat pumps could replace existing oil boilers in Irish homes by 2030”. Dr Connolly said a bright green future for Ireland was possible “if we have the ambition and the backing to grasp it . . . not only could our 2030 landscape be driven by clean, home grown renewables, but it will not cost more than using fossil fuels”. Up until now the EU target of 40 per cent renewable electricity by 2020 was the key driver for the Irish wind energy sector. The EU is currently evaluating what this target should be for 2030, which is expected to be finalised next year though the Government has yet to commit to a new target.

Source: https://www.irishtimes.com/business/energy-and-resources/ireland-s-electricity-should-be-70-per-cent-renewables-by-2030-says-wind-farm-group-1.3435536

CREST Centre in South West College, Enniskillen host Heat Recovery Seminar on Thursday 15th June

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CREST (Centre for Renewable Energy and Sustainable Technologies) at South West College, Enniskillen, in collaboration with Institute of Refrigeration Ireland (IRI) invites you to a FREE heat recovery seminar, and demonstration for industry on Thursday 15th June from 10.00am to 2.00pm in the CREST Pavilion.

There will be a light lunch and a tour and demonstration of the refrigeration workshop on site.

This event for food retailers and distributors, refrigeration and air conditioning engineers, food manufacturers and other interested parties will focus on ‘Road to Recovery’ (Heat Recovery Opportunities within Refrigeration and Air Conditioning)
Speakers on the day include:

Declan Fitzmaurice
Past President of the Institute of Refrigeration Ireland
“Innovative Commercial Solutions within the refrigeration, air conditioning and heat pump market

Paul Wharton – Technical Support Engineer, Danfoss
“Cooling Solutions and Heat Recovery Options for Cold Stores and Retailers”

Andrew Dunwoody – Technical Sales Engineer, Cross Refrigeration Group
“Gas Driven Heat Recovery in Air Conditioning Systems”

Jim Clarke – Technical Advisor, Efficiency and Resource Team, Invest NI

“Funding Support Options for Business.”

Raymond Howe – Course Co-Ordinator for Refrigeration / Air Conditioning at South West College
“Skills and Apprenticeship Programmes at SWC”

Heather Young – Industrial Development Associate, CREST
“Energy Efficiency Research & Development at CREST”

You can register for this event on Eventbrite, or for further information please contact Heather Young at heather.young@swc.ac.uk or telephone 028 8225 5223 Ext. 4229.