Advice Notes on Geothermal Economics for the NPA Region

Geothermal

The Advice Notes aim to provide introductory material for entrepreneurs, startups and SME’s, considering to enter into the renewable energy sphere and based in the NPA regions partners to GREBE. The scope of the Advice Note covers regional, trade and industry, renewable energy (RE), technology information from Ireland, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Iceland and Finland. Different partner regions have different level of deployment of the various RE technologies covered by the Advice Notes. Thus, the level of information will vary depending on the level of deployment for each technology. For example, wind is not deployed on a large scale in North Karelia (Finland); however, it is widely deployed in Scotland, Ireland and Northern Ireland.

Full details are available on the GREBE website:

http://grebeproject.eu/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/GREBE-Advice-Notes-Geothermal.pdf

The focus of the Advice Notes is on regional information of some of the main economic characteristics sited as imperative, when making an informed choice, regarding which RE technology may be the optimal choice for a new business venture:

  • Costs and economics associated with the relevant technology
  • Support schemes available, relevant to the technology
  • Government allowance/exemptions, relevant to the technology
  • Funding available for capital costs of the relevant technology
  • List of the relevant to the technology suppliers/developers, with focus on local/regional, suppliers/developers and the products and services they offer.

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It is understood that the ultimate source of geothermal energy is radioactive decay occurring deep within the earth. In most regions, this heat reaches the surface in a very diffuse state. Nevertheless, due to a range of geological processes, some areas, including substantial portions of the NPA region, are underlain by comparatively shallow geothermal resources.

However, Iceland is taking geothermal power and technology to an advanced level by exploiting the resource for power generation. Other countries in the NPA region are exploring options of exploiting the geothermal resources by the use of deep geothermal technology but are still far behind in comparison to Iceland.

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Albert Albertsson was awarded the Order of the Falcon

ICI blog

Albert Albertsson was awarded the Order of the Falcon on New Year’s Day for his contribution to geothermal utilisation. The award ceremony took place at Bessastaðir which is the official residence of the President of Iceland. Albert has worked at HS Orka since 1977 and has been at the forefront of innovation and development at the company since the beginning. He has led the way in implementing this approach and the resulting work practices within HS Orka.

Albert is amongst other things the concept creator of the Resource Park, which is located near the HS Orka Power Plant in Reykjanes. The Resource Park is unique and encourages the further development and improved utilisation of the resources provided by power plants. The goal of the Resource Park is a ‘Society without waste’ where all the resource streams of the power plant are utilised in a responsible manner and for the benefit and development of society.

Albert has always placed a great emphasis on educating others and knowledge dissemination, not only in the diverse field of geothermal utilisation but also in the field of technology and environmental issues. Albert’s co- workers would like to congratulate him on this great achievement. The Icelandic Order of the Falcon is the highest honour that the Icelandic state can bestow on individuals, both from home and abroad. The order was founded by King Christian X on the 3rd of July, 1921 to award those who make a significant contribution to Iceland.

(source: https://www.hsorka.is/en/about-us/news/albert-albertsson-was-awarded-order-falcon/)

Geothermal training education for developing countries in Iceland

ICI 18-10-2017

The Geothermal Training Programme of the United Nations University (UNU-GTP) is a postgraduate training program, aiming at assisting developing countries in capacity building within geothermal exploration and development. The program consists of six months annual training for practicing professionals from developing and transitional countries with significant geothermal potential. Priority is given to countries where geothermal development is under way, in order to maximize technology transfer.

The first official statement on establishing a UNU geothermal institute in Iceland was made in 1975 when the United Nations University (UNU) had just been established. After a first proposal in 1976 and an international workshop in 1978, the Government of Iceland decided in October 1978 to ask Orkustofnun (the National Energy Authority (NEA)), to sign an Agreement on Association with the UNU and establish the UNU Geothermal Training Programme (UNU-GTP). The UNU-GTP has been hosted by the NEA ever since.

The first annual training session of the UNU-GTP started in May 1979 with two UNU Fellows from the Philippines. Since then, a group of scientists and engineers from energy agencies and research organizations as well as universities in the developing countries and Central and Eastern European countries, have come to Iceland every spring to spend six months in highly specialized studies in geological exploration, borehole geology, geophysical exploration, borehole geophysics, reservoir engineering, chemistry of thermal fluids, environmental science, geothermal utilization, and drilling technology.

The development of geothermal resources requires a group of highly skilled specialists from a number of disciplines of science and engineering. Because of its diversity, geothermal energy has not been taught as a common subject at universities. The training of geothermal specialists has mainly taken place on-the-job within companies and institutions. International geothermal schools have contributed significantly in the transfer of geothermal technology, especially for the benefit of developing countries.

More recently, the UNU-GTP also offers a few successful candidates the possibility of extending their studies to MSc or PhD degrees in geothermal sciences or engineering in cooperation with the University of Iceland.

The UNU-GTP was established in the shadow of the oil crisis, when nations were looking for new and renewable energy sources in order to reduce dependence on hydrocarbons, in particular oil with its rapidly escalating prices. The current situation is somewhat similar in the sense that the international community is looking towards renewable energy sources as an alternative for the hydrocarbons in order to reduce the emissions of greenhouse gases.

The UNU-GTP yearbook “Geothermal Training in Iceland 2016” has now been published on print and released online and is now available for download under publications on the webpage http://www.unugtp.is.

Source: http://www.unugtp.is and http://www.nea.is

Orkustofnun-ensk