What is the cost of Ireland not achieving its renewable energy targets?

Can we remain hopeful despite not achieving renewable targets? Michael Doran, Director, Action Renewables and GREBE project partner discusses the issues surrounding Ireland’s progress towards 2020 energy targets in his article Ireland’s Inconvenient Truth, We face a triple cost for not achieving our energy targets by 2020′

Ireland is not close to achieving its energy and emissions targets. We are currently one of four countries in Europe expected to miss the 2020 targets set out by the European Directive. The other countries set to fall short are Luxembourg, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. Ireland is approximately 7% short of the 16% target. These legally binding targets from the 2009 Renewable Energy Directive, were set with the goal of reducing the greenhouse effect, securing energy supply, maximising renewables and saving money.

According to the SEAI, the cost to Ireland will be between €100-€150 million for each percentage point the country is short of the target. The SEAI report on Ireland’s Energy Targets: Progress, Ambition and Impacts depict the current progress towards achieving the targets, shown in the graph below, Figure 1.

AR 14-06-2017

The full article can be downloaded from the Action Renewables website here

 

Could Norway become a hydrogen nation?

h2-hydrogen

Local businesses in Narvik says yes – we both can and shall become a green hydrogen nation. “Let’s use the surplus and trapped renewable energy to produce hydrogen – and distribute the hydrogen and make it accessible to growing zero emission markets in Norway and the rest of the world”. This is the conclusion from the Hydrogen meeting in Narvik arranged by Narvik Science Park.

The Renewable Energy Directive 

The EU Renewable Energy Directive establishes an overall policy for the production and promotion of energy from renewable sources in the EU. It requires the EU to fulfill at least 20% of its total energy needs with renewables by 2020 – to be achieved through the attainment of individual national targets. All EU countries must also ensure that at least 10% of their transport fuels come from renewable sources by 2020.  In November 2016, the Commission published a proposal for a revised Renewable Energy Directive to make the EU a global leader in renewable energy and ensure that the target of at least 27% renewables in the final energy consumption in the EU by 2030 is met.

National action plans

The Directive specifies national renewable energy targets for each country, taking into account its starting point and overall potential for renewables. These targets range from a low 10% to a high of 50%. EU countries set out how they plan to meet these targets and the general course of their renewable energy policy in national renewable energy action plans – and the progress towards national targets is measured every two years when the EU countries publish national renewable energy progress reports.

The Directive promotes cooperation amongst EU countries and with countries outside EU (Norway) to help EU meet their renewable energy targets.

Norway – Hydrogen nation?

Norway would have a close cooperation with EU and will adapt to the Renewable Energy Directive by making national plans for Norway – especially for Hydrogen, where Norway would start to make a strategy for Hydrogen production and establishing Hydrogen Fuel stations  across the country from January 2017.

Norway is in a unique position as it has a surplus of renewable energy production, annually 20 Terrawatt hours, and limited grid capacity for export – which means trapped renewable energy production that could be used for Hydrogen production. There also exists a political will to support energy intensive industries such as hydrogen production. This means that hydrogen could play a significant role in the future – both as export of hydrogen and as fuel for national land transport (Network of Hydrogen fuel stations).

Hydrogen meeting in Narvik

The Narvik Hydrogen meeting was arranged by Narvik Science Park in cooperation with the Hydrogen production company; Glomfjord Hydrogen and the Hydrogen technology company; NEL Hydrogen – just to look into the interest for establishing Hydrogen fuel stations across Norway – and the local businesses interest for investing in Hydrogen fuel stations. 20 local companies say yes to hydrogen technology solutions and that Norway should become a hydrogen nation.

From Spring 2017 there would be a close cooperation between Narvik Science Park and ENOVA – to look closer into how local companies can contribute to investments in hydrogen technology solutions and establishing Hydrogen fuel stations in the Narvik region – as a bit of a national plan to become a hydrogen nation.