CREST Centre in South West College, Enniskillen host Heat Recovery Seminar on Thursday 15th June

Crest image

CREST (Centre for Renewable Energy and Sustainable Technologies) at South West College, Enniskillen, in collaboration with Institute of Refrigeration Ireland (IRI) invites you to a FREE heat recovery seminar, and demonstration for industry on Thursday 15th June from 10.00am to 2.00pm in the CREST Pavilion.

There will be a light lunch and a tour and demonstration of the refrigeration workshop on site.

This event for food retailers and distributors, refrigeration and air conditioning engineers, food manufacturers and other interested parties will focus on ‘Road to Recovery’ (Heat Recovery Opportunities within Refrigeration and Air Conditioning)
Speakers on the day include:

Declan Fitzmaurice
Past President of the Institute of Refrigeration Ireland
“Innovative Commercial Solutions within the refrigeration, air conditioning and heat pump market

Paul Wharton – Technical Support Engineer, Danfoss
“Cooling Solutions and Heat Recovery Options for Cold Stores and Retailers”

Andrew Dunwoody – Technical Sales Engineer, Cross Refrigeration Group
“Gas Driven Heat Recovery in Air Conditioning Systems”

Jim Clarke – Technical Advisor, Efficiency and Resource Team, Invest NI

“Funding Support Options for Business.”

Raymond Howe – Course Co-Ordinator for Refrigeration / Air Conditioning at South West College
“Skills and Apprenticeship Programmes at SWC”

Heather Young – Industrial Development Associate, CREST
“Energy Efficiency Research & Development at CREST”

You can register for this event on Eventbrite, or for further information please contact Heather Young at heather.young@swc.ac.uk or telephone 028 8225 5223 Ext. 4229.

Key researchers unanimous on the climate impacts of forests use

Finnish climate change panel

“Key researchers unanimous on the climate impacts of forests use”

(Press release of the Finnish Climate Change Panel)

Decision-makers, the media and the public have felt that there are contradictory messages on the climate impacts of the forest use. A new report by the Finnish Climate Change Panel illustrates that key Finnish researchers specialising in forestry are quite unanimous on the central claims related to the sustainability of bioeconomy. Discourse between researchers, decision-makers and enterprises, and the related advanced analyses are still necessary for creating a sustainable bioeconomy.

The Finnish Climate Change Panel surveyed researchers’ insights on the climate change impacts of forest use. Responses were assessed and processed by 28 researchers from the University of Helsinki, the Finnish Meteorological Institute, the University of Eastern Finland, the University of Jyväskylä, the Finnish Environment Institute and VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. The process included a joint seminar, two enquiry rounds related to claims, and approval of the document.

The main claims approved by researchers:

  • It is possible to increase wood production with forest management, but it is not possible to significantly increase the net growth of stem wood in the next decades. A significant increase can only be expected in the 2050s and after.
  • Increasing logging and wood harvesting will decrease the carbon sink and carbon storage of Finnish forests for at least forthcoming decades compared to a situation where harvesting is not increased.
  • The greatest climate benefit of wood use can be achieved with long-lasting wood-based products that preserve the carbon content of the wood in use for a long time and replace products that have a high-emission life cycle impact.
  • In the long term, replacing fossil fuels with forest energy will create climate benefits if fossil fuels are permanently replaced, forest lands are maintained and the growth of forests remains unchanged or increases in the future.
  • The model calculations representing the future development of Finnish forests produced to aid political decision-making should be completed with information such as analyses describing the different projected paths of climate change.
  • The goals set for the different ways of using forests – such as wood production, carbon sequestration, conservation and recreational use – compete with each other, so it is unlikely that these goals will be reached simultaneously.
  • A significant increase in forest harvests may lead to a clear deterioration of the forest biodiversity unless the matter is taken into account sufficiently with the practices of forest management and the forest conservation network.

According to the Climate Change Panel, the result provides a good basis for national and international discussion on the role of Nordic forests in EU policy on climate and bioeconomy. The climate-smart use of forests is an important part of creating a low-carbon economy. So that the path will be consistent and sustainable, bioeconomy decisions must be based on scientific data.” (Luke News)

The Original news article can be found from Luke´s news section under:

https://www.luke.fi/en/news/key-researchers-unanimous-climate-impacts-forests-use/

The link to the report “Main Messages from researchers concerning the climate impacts of forest utilization” can be found here: http://www.ilmastopaneeli.fi/uploads/selvitykset_lausunnot/Ilmastopaneeli_mets%C3%A4v%C3%A4itt%C3%A4m%C3%A4t_final_englanniksi_%202017.pdf

 

Few women in renewable energy management in Iceland

EY report

In Iceland, only one quarter of vice presidents of renewable energy companies are female and only 8% of directors or managing directors of these companies are female.  Furthermore in companies that are not under the law of equal gender division only 17% of presidents are women.

All this information and more is to be found in a newly published report by an Icelandic organisation called Konur í orkugeiranum (Kio) (women in the renewable energy industry) in cooperation with Ernst & Young on the status of females in senior positions in the renewable energy industry.

According to the report, women barely count for 50% of all committee members in renewable energy companies, 32% department managers, 24% managers and 8% senior managers and directors.

The report also shows the evaluation of womens influence in the sector. This evaluation was processed according to Ernst & Young international methodology. 12 companies took part in the evaluation and three companies scored the best.  These are Veitur Utilities, Landsnet Electricity Transmit and Reykjavik Energy.

In an interview with two members of Kio (Harpa Pétursdóttir and Auður Nanna Baldvinsdóttir) in the national newspaper, they were happy to see how many women attended the inaugural meeting on the 15th of January 2016. Harpa is the presedent of Kio and works in a private law firm with focus on renewable energy matters.  Auður is salesmanager in Landsvirkjun, the national power company of Iceland and also treasurer of Kio.

They both agree on the urgency of this organisation to strengthen the network between women in the industry and more importantly draw attention to women in various positions within the renewable energy sector and therefore assist them to become more visible and influential.

The conclusion is clear, there are quite many women in lower positions in the renewable energy sector but when it comes to higher positions and actions need to be taken. Harpa mentions that the report proves their suspicions.  For example of all the 11 general managers in the renewable energy sector, none of them is a woman.

The report is downloadable here http://www.konuriorkumalum.is/

Source: mbl.is 2.may 2017