Water-Energy Nexus Workshop – Wednesday 7th September 2016

Water-Energy Nexus

The Centre of Sustainable Technologies based at the University of Ulster is an inter-disciplinary research centre, challenging many aspects of sustainability associated with the built environment. Their remit is to undertake ground-breaking activities in a range of areas including architecture, building energy efficiency, clean combustion, construction, highways engineering, sustainability, renewable energy and river hydraulics. Recognising that these areas are of the utmost importance to a rapidly changing built environment reacting to climate change, they cite that their dominant research activity in terms of income and activity is energy.

The centre is hosting an event addressing the Water-Energy Nexus, looking at the challenges faced by the inextricable connection between water requirements and energy resources.  Taking place at the University of Ulster, Jordanstown Campus, the half day event has input from a range of leading experts in the field.

WATER- ENERGY NEXUS WORKSHOP – AGENDA

7th September 2016

Centre for Sustainable Technologies, Jordanstown Campus

Ulster University, Shore Road, Newtownabbey, Co. Antrim, BT37 0QB

9.45      Arrival and coffee

10.00 – 10:30 Welcome and Introduction

Dr Trevor Hyde, Reader, Centre for Sustainable Technologies

Ms Jane Wall, Project Development Manager, Dublin City University

10: 30-11.30 Reducing the energy demand of water utilities 

Dr Caterina Brandoni, Lecturer in Energy, Centre for Sustainable Technologies

Dr Lorna Fitzsimons, Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering, Dublin City University

Mr Ian Bingham, Energy Manager, Northern Ireland Water

11.30-11.40 Coffee Break

11.40-12.20 Water and energy in the city of the future

Dr Vanessa Speight, Research Fellow in Integrated Water Systems, Sheffield University

Mr Leonardo Piccinetti, Director REDINN

12.20-13.00 Technology innovation in the water and energy field

Prof Tony Byrne, Prof of Photocatalysis, Ulster University

Dr Patrick Dunlop, Lecturer in Engineering Materials, Ulster University

 13.00-14.00 Lunch

 The workshop will be chaired by Mr Dominic McLarnon, Horizon 2020 Northern Ireland Contact Point for Energy.

Please register your interest by email to Dr Caterina Brandoni (c.brandoni@ulster.ac.uk)

This workshop is funded by Dublin City University and Ulster University through the joint programme “Dublin City University-Ulster University Joint Research Workshops”.

Expected socio-economic benefits of bio-oil production in a resource periphery

The Finnish GREBE partners, Karelia UAS and LUKE, have assessed the direct and indirect socioeconomic impacts on a local, regional and national economy from forest biomass-based bio-oil production using input–output (I–O) analysis.

The planned fast pyrolysis bio-oil industry project will include two production units (each with the capacity of 90 000 tons of bio-oil) and related sites, a raw material terminal and infrastructures. The annual requirement for the biomass raw materials is approximately 700 000 solid m3, including by-products from the wood processing industries as well as round wood and smaller diameter energy wood. For fast pyrolysis bio-oil production, town of Lieksa has locational advantages, as there are available stocks of wood processing industry by-products (sawn dust, cutter shavings) with a currently limited market.

The analyses shows the potential of a bio-oil factory on the development of the local economy and determined the type of impacts bio-oil production has on population and employment development and on the public municipal economy. The study area is located in a resource periphery far from growing regions and suffers from development problems and stagnating development trends. In terms of employment and income, bio-oil production could have a significant positive net impact on the local economy despite leakages to regional and national economies. The impacts of bio-oil production could enhance the future development prospects for the resource periphery according to positive changes in the net migration and by slowing population losses.

Karelia UAS 01-09-2016

Pie chart from average estimates of the employment (number of jobs) and income (million euros) impacts of bio-oil factory construction and operation present at the local, regional and national levels. Size of the pie shows the scale of the total employment and income impacts of the construction and production periods.

For further information, please contact Lasse Okkonen (lasse.okkonen@karelia.fi), Olli Lehtonen (olli.lehtonen@luke.fi)